Quote of the week

[Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro] possesses, however, few of his predecessor’s resources, lacking not just oil revenue but Chávez’s surplus of charisma, humour and political skill. Maduro, unable to end the crisis, has increasingly sided with the privileged classes against the masses; his security forces are regularly dispatched into barrios to repress militants under the guise of fighting crime. Having lost its majority in Congress, the government, fearing it can’t win at the polls the way Chávez did, cancelled gubernatorial elections that had been set for December last year (though they now appear to be on again). Maduro has convened an assembly to write a new constitution, supposedly with the objective of institutionalising the power of social movements, though it is unlikely to lessen the country’s polarisation.

Greg Grandin
London Review of Books
27 February 2007

Arguments today in CC on RAF claims deadlines

Business Day reports that the Constitutional Court will today begin hearing arguments on whether a section of the Road Accident Fund Act governing the prescription of a claim is inconsistent with the constitution.

Section 23 (1) of the act sets a three-year limit for claimants to claim compensation after an accident. The fund is responsible for paying claims of accident victims and is financed by a fuel levy imposed on motorists.

This section is being challenged by accident victim Vusumzi Mdeyide, whose claim the fund rejected because it was instituted three days after the three-year period expired.

The fund is challenging the action, saying removing this clause will impede the fund’s expeditious processing of claims. The fund said it would also be difficult for it to forecast financial liability for outstanding claims.

Mdeyide, 38, has been blind since childhood and cannot read or write. He applied to the East London Circuit Court for compensation from the fund. Acting Judge Viwe Notshe found section 23(1) limited the right of claimants’ access to courts.

The right in issue is the right of access to courts guaranteed in section 34 of the Bill of Rights. I have not made a specific study of this case, but given the perilous state of the finances of the RAF, the Constitutional Court seems to find themselves in a difficult position.

On the one hand, a blind man – one of the most vulnerable members of society – is being denied something that others can claim. On the other hand, it seems to make sense to limit claims against the RAF to ensure that the fund does not go bankrupt. Much will depend, I think, on the actual facts of the case and whether the claimant could be said to have been negligent himself. I am glad I do not have to decide this one….

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