Quote of the week

The judgments are replete with the findings of dishonesty and mala fides against Major General Ntlemeza. These were judicial pronouncements. They therefore constitute direct evidence that Major General Ntlemeza lacks the requisite honesty, integrity and conscientiousness to occupy the position of any public office, not to mention an office as more important as that of the National Head of the DPCI, where independence, honesty and integrity are paramount to qualities. Currently no appeal lies against the findings of dishonesty and impropriety made by the Court in the judgments. Accordingly, such serious findings of fact in relation to Major General Ntlemeza, which go directly to Major General Ntlemeza’s trustworthiness, his honesty and integrity, are definitive. Until such findings are appealed against successfully they shall remain as a lapidary against Lieutenant General Ntlemeza.

Mabuse J
Helen Suzman Foundation and Another v Minister of Police and Others
4 September 2008

Calling the Magistrates Comission

Sometimes when I read a news report I have to check the date to see whether it is not perhaps April 1 and whether the report is not perhaps an April Fools joke. So it was when I read that a Pietermaritzburg magistrate, a former member of the Scorpions, has launched a legal bid to block state prosecutor Billy Downer from taking part in the case against ANC President Jacob Zuma.

According to IOL, in papers lodged in the Pietermaritzburg High Court, Magistrate Ashin Singh has applied to be admitted as an amicus curiae (friend of the court) in the Zuma case. In his papers he claims: “Unless one of the members of the team of prosecuting counsel is removed from that team, the accused will not be afforded a fair trial. The member of the team of the prosecuting counsel that I refer to is Mr WJ (Billy) Downer SC.” He claimed that Downer – a prosecutor in the Zuma matter – had “scant regard for honesty and integrity, and that he will wilfully mislead a court in breach of his legal obligation as a prosecutor”.

Now I have no knowledge of Mr Singh’s case or whether Billy Downer acted in an inappropriate way in this case, but as some readers of this Blog have already pointed out, it is highly irregular for a Magistrate to get involved in a criminal case over which he or she is not presiding.

Apart from the rules governing magistrates with which I am not intimately familiar, there is a broader principle at stake here that was addressed by the Constitutional Court in the case challenging the constitutionality of the Heath Special Investigative Unit. In that case the Constitutional Court made clear that the seperation of powers requires judicial officers not to get involved in actions that may drag them into the political arena.

The separation of powers doctrine requires judicial officers to stick to adjudicating cases and not to act in any other capacity not associated with their office. This is because the legitimacy of our courts really depends on this. The same principle was applied by the judges who found that the appointment of Nathan Erasmus as the head of a Commission of Enquiry by Ebrahim Rasool was unlawful.

One may well argue that judicial officers are also citizens and that they have a right and a duty to assist courts in impoartnt matters like this. But there are other – less problematic ways – of doing so. Mr Singh could have informed the Zuma camp of his gripes and could have been called as a witness.

He could also have complained to the National Director of Public Prosecutions and could have asked for Mr Downer to be dismissed. Instead, he is trying to insert himself as an amicus curiae party to one if not the most controversial criminal trial in the history of South Africa. This is so obviously unwise and beyond the role of a responsible judicial officer that one is tempted to speculate about Mr Singhs motives. But I would not want to exarcerbate the already problematic situation so will refrain from doing so.

I would think however, that Mr Singh has acted in a manner that may well be froned upon by the Magistrates Commission and would hope that this Commission would look into his conduct and would make an appropriate finding if they agree that this kind of action is highly inappropriate for any judicial officer.

SHARE:     
BACK TO TOP
2015 Constitutionally Speaking | website created by Idea in a Forest