Quote of the week

This is a book of desire denied, of what the pain of that impotence drives people to do, and how it makes them unwilling contortionists and even co-conspirators in their oppression. From ‘The Transformation of Harry’: “And there we all were; in an uncertain country, ourselves uncertain. A land with a sly heart; and ourselves ready to be deceived.” For if colonialism was any one thing it was denial: denial of land, denial of African culture, denial of any form of psychic nourishment—including hope—denial of black existence itself. And neocolonialism is the denial that any of that is still happening. First published in 1978, The House of Hunger speaks, or rather shouts, forward from its own time to 2017. Perhaps the most painful parts of the book to read are those that show how little has changed in thirty-nine years. For if colonialism was any one thing it was denial: denial of land, denial of African culture, denial of any form of psychic nourishment—including hope—denial of black existence itself. And neocolonialism is the denial that any of that is still happening.

Efemia Chela
On The House of Hunger by Dambudzo Marechera
27 March 2009

Et tu Trevor

Trevor Manual, who just loves to defend the corrupt arms deal, is at it again. Last night Manuel told a packed gathering at the University of Cape Town that saying anything against the Dalai Lama was in “many quarters equivalent to trying to shoot Bambi”, but the question was, who is he? According to Business Day:

“Is he just the spiritual leader of the Buddhists in Tibet or is he the one who on March 28 1959 established the government of Tibet in exile in the same way Taiwan was established to counter the legality of a single China?” Manuel asked. … “The reason why the Dalai Lama wants to be here is to make a big global political statement about the secession of Tibet from China. He wants to do it on the free soil of SA,” Manuel said.

This is terrible! I am shocked! I am chastised! If only I knew that the Dalai Lama opposed the annexation of his country by the Chinese,  and the vicious oppression of Tibetans and their language and religion. If only I knew the Dalai Lama had the bloody cheek to  launch a struggle to have his country restored to its people and that he – gasp! – established a government in exile after the annexation of Tibet by China, I would never have supported his visit to South Africa and would never have criticised the government for refusing him a visa.

If only I knew that the Dalai Lama was going to abuse the freedom of speech we have enshrined in our constitution to criticise the illegal annexation of his country by those freedom loving, human rights supporting, Chinese, I would never have mouthed off about the government decision.

After all, who wants to support a man who resists the annexation of his country? If we went down that road, we would have had to support Churchill in the second world war and this would have made Hitler very angry, for God sake! Surely anyone with a moral compass can now see how dangerous it would have been to allow that so called “peaceful” terrorist on our shores. He is for freedom and against tyranny and if we allowed him here it might actually give the natives ideas and we cannot have that, can we?

Really, South Africans just do not understand how precious our freedom of expression is, so they want to abuse it and want to allow a man of the cloth to talk about counter-revolutionary ideas like freedom and self-determination. But as the Minister has now pointed out, freedom must be jealously guarded so we should not share it with anyone. It’s far too dangerous! What next? Before we know it people will be agitating for the independence of Rhodesia and South West Africa (Oops, too late to stop that, I suppose.)

I am so proud of my Minister of Finance. He really knows his right from his wrong. Besides what is wrong with shooting Bambi? I never liked those big innocent eyes and always thought Bambi was a terrorist in Disney Drag. I am sure Trevor, on reflection, will agree that shooting one’s enemies – as the Chinese often do – is the way to go. Let’s start with Zille and Lekota. That will teach them a lesson and will show how freedom loving we really are. You go girl!

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