Constitutional Hill

On accountability, transparency and the “bribing” of journalists

It is a rather inconvenient fact (inconvenient for some people, at least) that the notion of an open, transparent and accountable government runs like a golden thread throughout our Constitution. Rejecting the secretive and often lawless bureaucratic managarialism of the apartheid era, in which citizens were more often than not treated as disembodied entities to be ordered around, controlled and sometimes dispensed with (and not as human beings with an inherent human dignity), the Constitution – also in this regard – demands a fundamental break with our apartheid past.

Thus section 1 of the South African Constitution states that the Republic of South Africa is founded on the values, inter alia, of “[u]niversal adult suffrage, a national common voters roll, regular elections and a multi-party system of democratic government, to ensure accountability, responsiveness and openness”.

These founding values are amplified in several sections of the Constitution to help create governance institutions that are truly open and transparent, that share information about their work, serve people, listen and respond to the concerns of voters, and do not shy away from scrutiny but invite it in order to improve the way in which they serve the public.

Thus section 55(2) of the Constitution states that the National Assembly must provide for mechanisms to ensure that all executive organs of state in the national sphere of government are accountable to it and to maintain oversight of the exercise of national executive authority, including the implementation of legislation; and any organ of state. Section 56 also states rather boldly that the National Assembly or any of its committees may summon any person (including any Minister or the President) to appear before it to give evidence on oath or affirmation, or to produce documents and may require any person or institution to report to it. When ministers claim that they have better things to do than account to Parliament or that information cannot be provided to Parliament for “national security” reasons, they are flouting the letter and the spirit of the Constitution.

Section 96(3) confirms this obligation to account by stating that ministers “are accountable individually to the President and to the National Assembly for the administration of their portfolios, and all members of the Cabinet are correspondingly accountable collectively for the performance of the functions of the national government and for its policies”. Section 195 of the Constitution extends these obligations to civil servants by stating that Public Administration must be accountable and that transparency must be fostered in the public service by providing the public with timely, accessible and accurate information.

To beef up this system of openness and accountability, section 32 of the Bill of Rights guarantees for everyone “the right of access to any information held by the state; and any information that is held by another person and that is required for the exercise or protection of any rights”.

It is against this background that one should evaluate the legal wrangling between Independent Newspapers and the ANC regarding the so called “brown envelope scandal” report prepared by the now Deputy Minister of Justice. Recall that the scandal centres around the alleged attempts by former Premier Embrahim Rasool (now safely “deployed” as South Africa’s ambassador to the USA), to bribe journalists in order to get their co-operation in smearing his political enemies inside the ANC and to provide positive news coverage for his ANC-led administration in the Western Cape.

This saga should really give some ammunition to those ANC and SACP leaders who complain that members of the media, civil society groups and other powerful role players are not required to adhere to the same standards of openness and transparency and are not subject to the same forms of accountability as members of the government is. Who guards the guardians, they ask. But curiously, this scandal has not been mentioned at all when these kinds of arguments have been put forward.

(Of course, in extreme cases, the argument is put forward that the constitutionally imposed rules should not be applied to politicians at all because others are not held to the same rules. Like school children caught smoking behind the bicycle shed they say the equivalent of: “But the teachers also smoke.” As such an argument defies logic, I will leave it aside for the moment.)

Nevertheless, this saga does raise serious questions about the ways in which politicians or other powerful and rich individuals or groups could pervert the democratic process by bribing journalists, columnists or other opinion-makers.

Last week judge Bennie Griesel released an internal ANC report (after having a so called “judicial peep at it in terms of section 80 of the Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA)) along with a short judgment giving reasons for this. It is very surprising, to say the least, that Griesel J released the report, despite the fact that the ANC might have wanted to appeal his judgment.

It is true that section 82 of PAIA states that the court hearing an application for access to information may grant any order that is just and equitable including orders confirming, amending or setting aside the decision which is the subject of the application. However, section 80(2) of PAIA states that when taking a “judicial peek” a judge may not disclose to any person “including the parties to the proceedings concerned” the contents of the document he or she had a “judicial peek” at.

As I understand these provisions of PAIA, what should have happened is that the learned judge should have ordered the ANC to hand over the report to Independent Newspapers and the ANC would then have had the opportunity to decide whether it wished to appeal the decision or whether it would hand over the report as ordered.

In my opinion the judge committed a serious blunder and the ANC had every reason to complain – on legal grounds – about the premature release of the report. The problem is that the blunder cannot be corrected as the report now forms part of the judgment and can be read by anyone.

However, two further questions arise from this saga. First, the “interim report” noted that the facts uncovered by the investigators raised serious questions about possible impropriety which had to be investigated further. The investigators could not determine the exact nature of the relationship between the Premier and his government on the one hand and the journalists and the company they were involved in on the other hand.

These questions were apparently never further investigated, despite the recommendations of the investigators that it should. The question is: why not? Given the concern expressed by some ANC leaders about the alleged unaccountability of journalists and about the corruption of journalists by money or political interests, it is curious that the party never bothered to find out whether its own Premier had bribed at least two journalists.

Surely, if the ANC was truly concerned about the lack of openness and accountability of the media and if it was prepared to act on its principles, it would have completed this investigation and would have taken firm action against Rasool if it had found that he had indeed bribed some journalists and would have handed the matter over to the police for possible criminal prosecution of the journalists (and of Rasool).

Does this mean the purported concerns expressed about the unaccountability of journalists and civil society leaders only relate to a concern about journalists not reporting favourably on the ANC or concern about civil society leaders who expose ANC government corruption or maladministration? And why was the ANC so desperate to keep this report secret? Surely, if the party was really respectful of the rights of citizens to have access to information, it should have volunteered to make this report public? Somehow it never did and would, so it now says, have even spent even more money to appeal the Griesel judgment had the judge not blundered and made the report public. Why all this secrecy if the party had nothing to hide?

The second, far more complex, question is whether journalists are indeed sufficiently transparent and accountable. How do we know that journalists report honestly and fairly about issues and how do we know that they have not been corrupted by both public and private money and power? When a journalist or columnist say nice things about a political leader, is this because the journalist or columnist was given some shares in a company or given a bribe? If a reporter claims that a new model car is the best in its class, is this perhaps because the vehicle manufacturer has showered the journalists with freebies?

Clearly, journalists and columnists are not in exactly the same position as politicians. Politicians are elected, journalists and columnists are not. Politicians make decisions about how our money should be taxed and how the taxes should be spent, journalists and columnists do not. Politicians can ride the gravy train, journalists cannot. Some politicians have enormous power: they can give instructions to the police to shoot and kill people, they can order the invasion of Lesotho (and how did that one work out for you honourable Mangosutho Buthelezi?), they can legally instruct spies to spread lies about perceived enemies of the state. Journalists and columnists can do none of these things.

The argument that journalists, columnists and civil society leaders should therefore be held accountable in exactly the same way as politicians can therefore not be sustained. Claiming that they exercise more power than the President who can make life and death decisions about our future is, quite frankly, absurd and also obviously self-serving.

Yet, as the brown envelope saga demonstrates, journalists, columnists and civil society leaders do potentially wield considerable power, their words and deeds influence public perceptions and can influence how the electorate vote. And we know that they can all be corrupted. Should we really trust that the “market” will hold them accountable (yeah right!) or that internal ethics rules will ensure that they are never corrupted by those in the public and private sector with the most money and or power?

And if we do not trust them to regulate themselves, how do we ensure some transparency and accountability on the part of journalists, columnists and civil society leaders, without endorsing a system of political control by the very politicians from whom we all need serious protection?

  • ozoneblue

    What is an “independant newspaper”?

  • spoiler

    It may have been a blunder but good on Grisel J for releasing the report.

    Surely the press here are much the same as anywhere else. The difference is the standard of the reader. What we need are critical readers who do not simply believe anything thats written in a paper and seek alternative points of veiw.

    I think social media and talk radio play a big role here and perhaps the power of the print media is overstated.

  • Gwebecimele
  • Chris (Not the right wing guy)

    Gwebecimele
    February 9, 2012 at 14:31

    I wanted to say “What a disgrace” but I’m afraid I might get sued.

  • Gwebecimele

    The Prez SAYS the turbulence is over it will be plain sailing from now on wards.

    Mix up of university for NC not NW.

    Bafana will practice on how to watch on big flat screens, sodas and burgers from RamaMcdonalds.

  • Gwebecimele

    Song and Dance Cheer leaders ignored the warning(getting fat) of the Prez and proceeded in a song to the food tent.

  • Gwebecimele
  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Oh well, while Zuma was twittering and facebooking …

    Johannesburg – The prisons department has extended a multimillion-rand catering tender to a company implicated in massive tender fraud and corruption.

    http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Bosasa-scores-again-20120209-2

  • George Gildenhuys

    ANC is corrupt. What else is new?

  • ozoneblue

    And while we are talking free market dynamics versus government control.

    Bank of England injects another £50bn into UK economy

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-16963116

    “Joanne Segars, the chief executive of the National Association of Pension Funds, said while she could understand the need to boost the economy, QE was damaging the value of pensions: “Retirees who get locked into a weak annuity will find that the Bank’s money printing leaves them out of pocket for the rest of their lives.”

    Socialism for the rich, capitalism for the poor.

  • Snowman

    Congratulations to Judge Bennie Griesel. You did the right thing.

  • abidam

    Congratulations to Judge Bennie Griesel.

    He obviously saw from the report that the ANC masters had no intention of releasing or for that matter doing anything about the serious questions about possible impropriety.

    It seems as if this acceptance of impropriety by the ANC of their own is the very reason why the ANC needs to have a secrecy bill and regulate the press;they seem to feel they cannot hide the corruption any longer.

    If the reporting of blatend corruption is taken from the newsmedia we will be left with only the advertisments.This is indeed a sad day.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Eish Nic Dawes,

    You mean CJ Moegeng-squared, don’t you?

    But a more likely reason is that too many judges and lawyers now feel that appointments are made without a rational consideration of all the relevant factors, or worse, that they are prearranged by the big powers within a commission that is heavily tilted toward politicians, most of whom are drawn from the governing party.

    http://mg.co.za/article/2012-02-10-unspoken-judgment

    Well done Pres Zuma – now you have to go beg the better candidates to “apply within”.

  • ozoneblue

    “Bosasa was awarded the catering tender for the first time in 2004 after a decision by correctional services to privatise prison kitchens.

    The company, headed by politically-connected businessman Gavin Watson, subsequently scored more multimillion-rand tenders from the prisons department.”

    Three hurrahs and a fart for more PRIVATIZATION then. Privatization, tendering out of almost everything including the ability to wipe your own arse, systematic destruction of the capacity of the state to deliver basic services all part of the “liberalization” and “free market” philosophy then.

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 9:21 am

    “appointments are made without a rational consideration of all the relevant factors,”

    Yep. Says the racist chameleon, racial demographics are the only rational and relevant factors. Like his son who is captain of the provincial cricket team even though he doesn’t know how to hold a bat.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Hmmm, tough one Cde J!

    Jeremy Cronin says the courts are people by potentially fallible human beings, not demigods

    … How, do we ensure that the institution of the judiciary is peopled by individuals who continue to foster the transformational vision so well articulated by former Chief Justices like Ismail Mahomed and Arthur Chaskalson? …

    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71639?oid=279404&sn=Detail&pid=71616

    “Some (the reactionaries and counter-revolutionaries) among us” would argue that the process to select South Africa’s finest should itself be beyond reproach. As should be the pool of candidates. They may even argue that the final list presented, should be that which will give our President sleepless nights having to decide from among the best of the best of exemplary people.

    The alternative, as the ANC has invented, is better – select a pliable sycophant, load the JSC with “pro-choice” commissioners, tweak the rules a teeny bit (or a lot) to fit the hand-picked one and off we go. Just like Superman – up, up and away!

    And then sit back and wait to explain to future generations why we fucked up South Africa’s (and possibly the world’s) finest institution.

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 10:23 am

    You forgot to quote this part.

    “But when he comes to countering the allegation that the judiciary is “untransformed” he slips into that narrowest of meanings. He does a racial and gender quota head-count. Of course, achieving more balanced representivity in key positions of authority and power is not irrelevant, but, as we know from the bitter experience of narrow BEE – cosmetic changes at the top may be a distraction from the task of sustained transformation across the system itself.”

    Scrap BEE, scrap racially based AA, scrap this obsession with “demographics” and appoint the best guy for the job.

    Finish and klaar.

  • http://kak.com vuyo

    Dear Professor de Vos
    Clearly what is needed is a radical departure from colonial socio-politico-economic strictures, including the capitalist property relations. We must therefore all give praise to the following judgment of the high court, regarding the colonial notion of “Senior Counsel”.

    http://mg.co.za/uploads/2012/02/09/n-high-court-judgment-on-senior-counsel-feb-9-2012.pdf

    What’s your view regarding the judgment? Since it determines the invalidity of a presidential act, I imagine that it must be heard by the gentlemen and ladies in braamfontein? Please kindly discuss.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 10, 2012 at 10:47 am

    Hey OB,

    “Scrap BEE, scrap racially based AA, scrap this obsession with ‘demographics’ and appoint the best guy for the job.”

    We will disagree on that for a long while yet – anyway that’s another discussion.

    But I will concede that BEE and AA is turning out to be a disaster, perhaps even a national tragedy.

    The impression being created by the choice of people is that only really useless, lazy, incapable, corrupt, crooked or otherwise extremely unsuitable Black people are available for deployment to strategically important posts.

    South Africa has a massive pool of extremely talented people who have become victims to the unpatriotic leaders awful approach to the NDR. The respectability which ought to be accorded to people working for government is diminishing very rapidly, carrying in its wake the many, many good people along with it.

    It’s reflected in the struggle to get good candidates for South Africa’s most prestigious office (i.e. CC judge) – let’s hope this is an eye-opener for the powers that be!

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 12:51 pm

    Wow. Just wow.

    – you can make sense sometimes hey LOL

  • Brett Nortje

    No, he means instead of a certain Indian person.

    “The impression being created by the choice of people is that only really useless, lazy, incapable, corrupt, crooked or otherwise extremely unsuitable Black people are available for deployment to strategically important posts.”

  • Brett Nortje

    He means one specific Indian person…

    “South Africa has a massive pool of extremely talented people who have become victims to the unpatriotic leaders awful approach to the NDR. The respectability which ought to be accorded to people working for government is diminishing very rapidly, carrying in its wake the many, many good people along with it.”

  • Brett Nortje

    Much beloved on this blog…

  • Gwebecimele

    OB

    In theory your “Human Race” is the perfect scenarion but you are 2 generations ahead of the country. Only demographics will tell us how far we have travelled down that road.

    Hence UCT and others are saying put an alternative (not delaying tricks) on the table. In this transformation there is something for everyone grant, RDP house, University entrance, NHI, tender, license, AA, Skills dev, Enterprise Dev, Deployment etc. If these are implemented properly with genuine targets that should take us to the “Human Race “. We must de-racialise the taxi drivers, domestic workers, petrol attendants, call centres, gardners, lawyers, doctors, engineers, shack dwellers etc

  • Jama ka Sijadu

    THE SPEECH THAT GOT JFK KILLED:

    Who would think that words spoken in 1961 would have such relevance in the South Africa (& the world) of 2012.

    http://www.thepowerhour.com/news3/jfk_speech_transcript.htm

    This is a portion of the speech that President John F. Kennedy gave at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel on April 27, 1961. “The President and the Press” before the American Newspaper Publishers Association.

    “The very word “secrecy” is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and secret proceedings. We decided long ago that the dangers of excessive and unwarranted concealment of pertinent facts far outweighed the dangers which are cited to justify it. Even today, there is little value in opposing the threat of a closed society by imitating its arbitrary restrictions. Even today, there is little value in insuring the survival of our nation if our traditions do not survive with it. And there is very grave danger that an announced need for increased security will be seized upon those anxious to expand its meaning to the very limits of official censorship and concealment. That I do not intend to permit to the extent that it is in my control. And no official of my Administration, whether his rank is high or low, civilian or military, should interpret my words here tonight as an excuse to censor the news, to stifle dissent, to cover up our mistakes or to withhold from the press and the public the facts they deserve to know.”

    “For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy that relies on covert means for expanding its sphere of influence–on infiltration instead of invasion, on subversion instead of elections, on intimidation instead of free choice, on guerrillas by night instead of armies by day. It is a system which has conscripted vast human and material resources into the building of a tightly knit, highly efficient machine that combines military, diplomatic, intelligence, economic, scientific and political operations.

    Its preparations are concealed, not published. Its mistakes are buried not headlined. Its dissenters are silenced, not praised. No expenditure is questioned, no rumor is printed, no secret is revealed.”

    No President should fear public scrutiny of his program. For from that scrutiny comes understanding; and from that understanding comes support or opposition. And both are necessary. I am not asking your newspapers to support the Administration, but I am asking your help in the tremendous task of informing and alerting the American people. For I have complete confidence in the response and dedication of our citizens whenever they are fully informed.

    I not only could not stifle controversy among your readers– I welcome it. This Administration intends to be candid about its errors; for as a wise man once said: “An error does not become a mistake until you refuse to correct it.” We intend to accept full responsibility for our errors; and we expect you to point them out when we miss them.

    Without debate, without criticism, no Administration and no country can succeed– and no republic can survive. That is why the Athenian lawmaker Solon decreed it a crime for any citizen to shrink from controversy. And that is why our press was protected by the First (emphasized) Amendment– the only business in America specifically protected by the Constitution– not primarily to amuse and entertain, not to emphasize the trivial and sentimental, not to simply “give the public what it wants”–but to inform, to arouse, to reflect, to state our dangers and our opportunities, to indicate our crises and our choices, to lead, mold educate and sometimes even anger public opinion.

    This means greater coverage and analysis of international news– for it is no longer far away and foreign but close at hand and local. It means greater attention to improved understanding of the news as well as improved transmission. And it means, finally, that government at all levels, must meet its obligation to provide you with the fullest possible information outside the narrowest limits of national security… and we intend to do it.

    “And so it is to the printing press–to the recorder of mans deeds, the keeper of his conscience, the courier of his news– that we look for strength and assistance, confident that with your help man will be what he was born to be: free and independent.”

  • Gwebecimele

    @ JkS

    Powerful speech, he was ahead of his time.

  • Gwebecimele

    Is the Prez not guilty of reducing Nationalisation to a Malema statement?
    If memory serves me well this(policy position) has been adopted by ANC structures such as ANCYL, ANC (Limpopo) etc.

    How a come a room full of informed South Africans missed that or is it the case of what you want to hear?

    http://www.thenewage.co.za/43049-9-53-Nationalisation_not_SA_policy

  • ozoneblue

    Gwebecimele
    February 10, 2012 at 13:57 pm

    “We must de-racialise the taxi drivers, domestic workers, petrol attendants, call centres, gardners, lawyers, doctors, engineers, shack dwellers etc”

    So in essence your “transformation” project is primarily a RACIAL one. We should sustain and nurture a society based on a sharp class division and exploitation – we should just ensure that such a system is not racially skewed. If I understand the PdVs (new?) position in line with UCT thinking that is sort of it.

    As I said – a new grand racial based alignment project in line with Verwoerdian social engineering thinking that contradicts not only the basic premises of human rights [only for a generation or two\perhaps three?] but also the most fundamental principles of the Freedom Charter.

  • ozoneblue

    Perhaps a note to Dr Max Price and UCT management on what the ANC stands for:

    “Education shall be free, compulsory, universal and equal for all children; Higher education and technical training shall be opened to all by means of state allowances and scholarships awarded on the basis of merit;”

    http://www.anc.org.za/show.php?id=72

  • Dmwangi

    ozoneblue
    February 10, 2012 at 12:55 pm
    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 12:51 pm

    Wow. Just wow.

    – you can make sense sometimes hey LOL

    He’s picking up some of my sagacity.

    While I think current AA/BEE is a disaster, ppl make too much of it. It hurts whites less than think and it helps blacks less than they think. Keep it. Get rid of it. The course of very few lives will be irretrievably altered.

  • Henri

    Just an historical footnote, lest it be forgotten: Our first Chief Justice [Head of the Constitutional Court] was a communist:
    “The former chief justice, Arthur Chaskalson recently made a very important intervention into this general debate. Chaskalson (who, by the way, was an SACP delegate to the CODESA constitutional negotiations back in 1991) was speaking at a UCT law workshop in late January. Quoting extensively from the preamble to the Constitution and from landmark Constitutional Court judgments, Chaskalson lucidly debunks the notion that the Constitution is somehow an impediment to radical transformation.”
    According to Cronin himself:
    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71639?oid=279404&sn=Detail&pid=71616

  • Jama ka Sijadu

    Dmwangi says:
    February 10, 2012 at 15:55 pm

    With respect, AA & BEE should not be put in the same basket as they are not the same thing.
    AA has had a far-reaching positive impact on the lives of a few million talented & educated South Africans who would have otherwise been relegated to being teagirls, messengers, clerks, secretaries etc for the rest of their lives, thanks to the likes of OzoneB & other un-reconstructed RACISTS who would rather not share their cricket fields, boardrooms & gyms with their ‘compatriots.’

    Thanks

  • Brett Nortje

    Of course, Jama is right. We see this in every municipality, Limpopo, education in the Eastern Cape, Baragwanath….

    “AA has had a far-reaching positive impact on the lives of a few million talented & educated South Africans who would have otherwise been relegated to being teagirls, messengers, clerks, secretaries etc….”

  • ozoneblue

    Dmwangi
    February 10, 2012 at 15:55 pm

    The truth is that whenever nationalist African dictatorship deteriorate into the barbaric chaos we saw in places like Uganda and Zimbabwe then Marxism/Communism/Socialism you-name-it gets the blame.

    We don’t want another Zaire, Zimbabwe or Uganda – we want a Cuba, a Brazil or a Sweden.

    Malema: ANCYL to fight ‘greedy yellow communists’

    http://mg.co.za/article/2009-12-15-malema-ancyl-to-fight-greedy-yellow-communists

  • ozoneblue

    Jama ka Sijadu
    February 10, 2012 at 16:11 pm

    You can call me racist as much as you like but you will not shut me up because I know what you are and I know what that the values I stand for stand for are deeply enshrined in a decades old document called the Freedom Charter. You should take some time off from posting your racist rubbish in here and read it some time.

    Here is a link to help you out my brother:

    http://www.anc.org.za/show.php?id=72

  • Dmwangi

    ‘With respect, AA & BEE should not be put in the same basket as they are not the same thing.’

    That is a fair point. But I still don’t think the efficacy of AA is as great as some purport– or so the data would indicate.

    ‘The truth is that whenever nationalist African dictatorship deteriorate into the barbaric chaos we saw in places like Uganda and Zimbabwe then Marxism/Communism/Socialism you-name-it gets the blame.’

    More of a distributive capitalist, myself. I’m pretty dubious about large centers of power, be they Western financial institutions or bureaucrats having a monoploy on the factors of productions.

  • ozoneblue

    Dmwangi
    February 10, 2012 at 16:35 pm

    “More of a distributive capitalist, myself.”

    LOL. That is not an oxymoron.

    How many capitalist do you know about who distribute the profits fairly amongst the contributors?

  • sirjay jonson

    ozoneblue
    February 10, 2012 at 16:26 pm

    “Marxism/Communism/”etc gets the blame, inevitably justly deserved I might add. Re JuJu and the yellow peril (thought communists were red), not much impacting difference between reds and fascists. Juju naturally doesn’t recognize his fascist tendencies.

    As for socialism, there a great difference between Democratic Socialism and the dictatorial kind, as there is between capitalism and compassionate capitalism.

  • Dmwangi

    ‘Fairly’ is hard to define. But generally, it will be a function of one’s output or the output of their assets.

    Anyway, was referring to this: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributism

  • Jama ka Sijadu

    Brett Nortje says:
    February 10, 2012 at 16:26 pm

    Brett, you seem to be confusing employment equity with (poor) cadre deployment & incompetence, connected comrades behaving badly etc….again, not the same thing.

    You would also see it (the impact of AA) in the wider spectrum of South Africans now participating in corporate South Africa, you would see it in the growing middle class, the increase the number of black owned businesses & in revenue collected by SARS, the housing market boom of a few years ago, the general growth of our economy, (even though this is not strong enough to create sufficient employment).
    Although its implementation has been far from perfect, fact is AA has had virtually no impact on whites (except those previously employed by the government), but a tremendously positive impact on blacks.

    OB: I have been reading the freedom charter since I was a teenager, but unlike you, I would never try & use it to justify white privilege.

  • sirjay jonson

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 12:51 pm

    I agree that cadre deployment has damaged ‘capable’ blacks’ deserved opportunities to advance. You limit the bright and dedicated for the politically connected. Considering that this policy damages many blacks and minorities (think SAPS and warders for starters – now national demographically placed in provinces), include of course enormous damage to the country as a whole. On whatever world can we call this a successful or beneficial accomplishment.

    Its a form of tribal nepotism really, and we are all losing out.

    And yes, appoint the best man/woman for the job. Or is it more important to weaken the country and all its citizens, including eventually the cadres themselves, for votes? Small minded, mean, short sighted thinking.

  • Dmwangi

    ‘controlled and sometimes dispensed with (and not as human beings with an inherent human dignity)’

    PdV: I still find it incomprehensible that a self-described Nietzschean deconstructionist throws around terms like ‘human dignity’ without a second thought.

  • sirjay jonson

    Jama ka Sijadu
    February 10, 2012 at 17:15 pm

    in your response to the OB

    “…unlike you, I would never try & use it to justify white privilege.”

    It appears however, you do so to justify black privilege. Yes, or no?

  • ozoneblue

    Dmwangi
    February 10, 2012 at 19:21 pm

    “PdV: I still find it incomprehensible that a self-described Nietzschean deconstructionist throws around terms like ‘human dignity’ without a second thought.”

    Yep.

  • sirjay jonson

    OB: You should know better re Prof. Where else but at Prof’s blog would you get the chance to state your beliefs as you do. Give thanks where it is due.

  • Lisbeth

    Dmwangi:

    Everyone – at least in South Africa – has “inherent dignity” which has to be respected and protected; our famous Constitution insists on it. Even “Nietzschean deconstructionists” have to adhere to this, whether they like it or not.

    But, of course, Nietzsche was right.

  • sirjay jonson

    @Brett: As an aside, the winter snows in the Rockies wasn’t enough, so heading back for a few months of sailing, kyaking and hiking (hopefully even lovemaking on the Cdn Shield under summer’s sun) in June.

    Enjoy your posts by the way on other sites.

  • sirjay jonson

    @Brett: I’ll tweet it occasionally @solinus on twitter.

  • Brett Nortje

    We missed you. WHat was the weather like, Sirjay?

    Friends in Belgium told me last weekend they have never experienced such cold.

  • Brett Nortje

    Jama ka Sijadu says:
    February 10, 2012 at 17:15 pm

    Be honest, Jama. The trend started decades before the ANC came to power. And the foundation was laid even before that. During the 80s growing the black middle class was almost a national obsession. Show me the SBDC now.

    “You would also see it (the impact of AA) in the wider spectrum of South Africans now participating in corporate South Africa, you would see it in the growing middle class, the increase the number of black owned businesses & in revenue collected by SARS, the housing market boom of a few years ago, the general growth of our economy, (even though this is not strong enough to create sufficient employment).”

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    sirjay jonson
    February 10, 2012 at 17:28 pm

    Sirjay,

    “And yes, appoint the best man/woman for the job.”

    That will be wonderful if it were possible.

    How would “the best person for the job” be found; and deployed?

    Let’s consider an easy example – a street sweeper for example!

    Or a more complex one – A neurosurgeon at say Groote Schuur.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Dmwangi
    February 10, 2012 at 19:21 pm

    Hey Dm,

    “PdV: I still find it incomprehensible that a self-described Nietzschean deconstructionist throws around terms like ‘human dignity’ without a second thought”

    Yeah – the cheek of PdV!

    Do say though – what would Idi Amin have said?

  • ozoneblue

    sirjay jonson
    February 10, 2012 at 17:02 pm

    ““Marxism/Communism/”etc gets the blame, inevitably justly deserved I might add. Re JuJu and the yellow peril (thought communists were red), not much impacting difference between reds and fascists. Juju naturally doesn’t recognize his fascist tendencies.”

    So I guess that is one more involuntary racist white vote or Juju then. I tell you what – you and the racist DA and the equally racist ANC right-wing create a new political party – How about that?

    You can have and ANC/Anglo-American public-private partnership with their UCT rubberstamping their pseudo-intellectual racist dogma just as we had National Party/Anglo-American public-private partnership with SU doing very much the same for Verwoerd.

    “The refinement of apartheid into a ‘separate-but-equal’ policy can be attributed to Verwoerd, who strongly advocated a theory of separate ‘nations’. He argued that contact between groups would hinder their evolution into independent nationhood. His willingness to guide Black people to self-determination once he considered them ready, won him many new White supporters. He promised that the different ‘tribal nations’ living in the Republic would be given equal political rights in their own ‘homelands’. This represented a radical swing in NP policy as previous leaders D.F. Malan and J.G. Strijdom had preached a naked form of White racism and ‘baasskap’ (paternalistic domination) in order to retain Whites in a position of power.”

    http://www.sahistory.org.za/people/hendrik-frensch-verwoerd

  • sirjay jonson

    @Brett: thanks for the missing me. I’ve known -55C with wind chill to boot pushing it to -80. Freezers typically run at 1 or 2 degrees below freezing. Actually, it makes you feel amazingly alive. You can’t let the horses loose in such temps, they run themselves in excitement to death (lungs freeze literally). You feel so exhilarated and want to run and jump about with high energy, although wisely not when when your toes or nose are freezing black… very dangerous.

    Canada is a nation of extreme opposites (even politically), but we’re talking weather at the moment. Dress for it, and its no problem.

    There is nothing in the world like minus low temps with crystal white snow, clear skies or snow floating down. But that just winter. Summer, the grass turns brown with the heat, the lakes are warm (largest bodies of fresh water in the world) life is good. And just think, Canada, as wide as Africa is high, with only 30 million souls, 80% living within50 miles of US boarder, and as such so much wild space, hard to describe.

    And to boot, Canada is a non racial, equalitaian society. Only problem for SAfricans, and there are many there, coming from this lekker climate, are the winters and its cold temps, and the lack of amenable inexpensive servants (for lack of a better explanation), and the SAfricans occasional SAfrican attitudes towards non whites (who are few in Canada) but lots of Chinese and other ‘non whites’, Indians,many of whom I know, and folks immigrated from world wide, as in the US.

    I couldn’t care less about the politics there, but I do so love the land outside the cities where as a man I am at peace with my environment which offers me so much.

    Nice to hear from you, cheers.

  • sirjay jonson

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 21:30 pm

    Reread your comment and please, if I may politely request, could you think about your comments? Are you suggesting there are insufficient processes available to determine or for that matter, promote expertise.

    I think Maggs has just identified a major SAfrican challenge, the inability to recognize ability, or utilize it. Now I’m beginning to understand SA. What do you suggest Maggs, can we not develop this insight? Expertise, excellence??? How do we recognize and exploit it to the country’s benefit? And further, is it of use to our nation or not? Undoubtedly our tentrepreneurs would disagree, expertise in their venue reads exploitation of the ignorant. However, in our real SAfrican world’s daily life, expertise and excellence is grossly ignored. Why is that?

  • sirjay jonson

    ozoneblue
    February 10, 2012 at 21:35 pm

    “Racist DA”!!!!!!!!

    Ah OB, that’s why I’m so confused with your posts. It appears to me that you are struggling with your identity. Since I don’t know you, however, I would suggest you study Buddhism, learn to meditate and know yourself. Your posts are so confusing. Perhaps with all my privileged upbringing, an obnoxious rebel much happier traversing the forests in search of game, sailing fresh and sea water, admired by many women, which I admit I took advantage of, but man you come across as confused.

    What do you believe. I read all your posts but I still don’t get it, or get you. Who are you?

    Quote: “… you and the racist DA”. Do you actually think I will take this comment seriously, or that the DA is racist, when as a western Democrat I don’t recognize expertise when I see it? You have so much to offer OB. You’re a thinker and struggling with the inequalities and challenges of SA. And I honor you for your intent and energy.

    But please man, sit back, breath, think about what we the citizens of SA, who are concerned with life here, and think about yourself and how you are expressing your sincere, I have no doubt, beliefs.

    Whew! Your greatest challenge is yourself.

  • Dmwangi

    Lisbeth;

    ‘Everyone – at least in South Africa – has “inherent dignity” which has to be respected and protected; our famous Constitution insists on it. Even “Nietzschean deconstructionists” have to adhere to this, whether they like it or not.

    Notice, this has no bearing on the ontological existence of human rights.

    ‘But, of course, Nietzsche was right.’

    About women being inferior?

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    sirjay jonson
    February 10, 2012 at 22:01 pm

    Sirjay,

    All that is not relevant to my quest to find out how “the best person for the job” is to be found.

    Do say!

  • Dmwangi

    You may be persuading me….

  • ozoneblue

    sirjay jonson
    February 10, 2012 at 22:21 pm

    “What do you believe. I read all your posts but I still don’t get it, or get you. Who are you?”

    I don’t know what its is you don’t understand about me. So let me try and describe it to you succuantly in simple terms that you can understand:

    I’m the decedent of an Afrikaner mineworker that can claim that my forefathers have been there and that I think I can understand.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_uSl50k_BM&feature=related

  • Dmwangi

    ‘I’m the decedent of an Afrikaner mineworker that can claim that my forefathers have been there and that I think I can understand.’

    Yeah, Afrikaners treated blacks horrifically but it doesn’t follow from that that they all live(d) on easy street.

    My wife wouldn’t like this but perhaps instead of AA and BEE, government should put a quash to racial categories once and for all by promoting interracial canoodling. I love African women but I’d be willing to sacrifice for the sake of non-racial society.

  • ozoneblue

    Dmwangi
    February 11, 2012 at 0:44 am

    “Yeah, Afrikaners treated blacks horrifically but it doesn’t follow from that that they all live(d) on easy street. ”

    [or treated/treat blacks horrifically]. Contrary to a common held misconception all Afrikaners were not raised in a home that promoted a White supremacist outlook. Although my parents voted for the Nats the use of the k-word word and/or showing disrespect towards black people was strictly forbidden. The rationale for Apartheid at the time was Verwoerd’s ‘separate-but-equal’ doctrine. I was too young at the time to see or understand the bigger picture.

  • Lisbeth

    Dmwangi –

    “Notice, this has no bearing on the ontological existence of human rights”

    You mentioned “human dignity” in your previous post, not human rights. As far as I’m concerned, humans – at this stage of their evolution – should start being concerned about human responsibilities. I’m sick to death of people endlessly harping about their rights.

    “About women being inferior?”

    This is a subject riddled with controversy. Let’s not even go there.

  • Lisbeth

    sirjay –

    “Freezers typically run at 1 or 2 degrees below freezing”

    If that’s your freezer you’re talking about, better throw it out NOW, together with all the meat you’ve been storing in there.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Dmwangi
    February 11, 2012 at 0:44 am

    Hey Dm,

    “I love African women but I’d be willing to sacrifice for the sake of non-racial society.”

    Brett will be so excited – he has been available for a while now.

    p.s. “My wife wouldn’t like this but perhaps instead of AA and BEE, government should put a quash to racial categories once and for all by promoting interracial canoodling.” – of course your wife would not like that – it makes you sound like a real loser.

    Our government has more important stuff to do than chatting up romantic partners for you!

    Grow some balls II – do your own sweet talking.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Power of constitutional review is real issue behind attack on judiciary

    If the critics of the present judiciary prefer the model of government as set out in Sachs v Minister of Justice, it is high time they introduced honesty into the debate and informed the country that they believe constitutional democracy is unsuitable for South Africa.

    Were the criticism simply about judicial performance in individual cases, or about the need for greater deference to the executive in judgments, that would be the stuff of democratic debate. But Chaskalson exposes the real basis of these attacks: a profound disagreement with the very power of constitutional review.

    http://mg.co.za/article/2012-02-10-power-of-constitutional-review-is-real-issue-behind-attack-on-judiciary

  • Alibama

    Although I still don’t know how to define/explain “dignity” which is THE annoying wussie-word of PdV,
    this post of his is one of those where I have to take a rest during reading it. Each paragraph is a
    hammer-blow, which convinces me that forces are building against those 60’s mentality Oos-rand mafia lawers.
    Who else believes the theory that profound/resonating statements [like PdV often makes] depletes the gravy/dopamine
    in the brain, which causes a need to rest, before reading further?
    —> ozoneblue says: What is an “independant newspaper”?
    It’s an enterprize who’s aim is DIRECTLY to earn a return on investment [eg. by sales & adds]
    and NOT INDIRECTLY eg. by fooling the electorate, while the national wealth is being looted.
    So “Life is better with coke” is dependant [on Coke corp]/INDIRECT, and is DIRECT/independant.
    –>Dmwangi says: “AA has had a far-reaching positive impact on the lives of a few million talented & educated South
    Africans who would have otherwise been relegated to being teagirls, messengers, clerks, secretaries etc for the
    rest of their lives,..”
    That is false because it implies that ‘the market’ [my greed to get the best bargain] doesn’t work.
    Your problem is a zillion UNEMPLOYable: mainly due to the teachers union. I can’t find competence!

  • Dmwangi

    Lisbeth:

    You are coming dangerously close to ending the gender controversy.

    ‘You mentioned “human dignity” in your previous post, not human rights. As far as I’m concerned, humans – at this stage of their evolution – should start being concerned about human responsibilities.’

    First, you referenced your ‘famous Constitution,’ which is replete with rights. Second, human rights arise from the fact that humans possess a certain dignity. (I.e. We distinguish a good or right action from a bad one based on whether it enhances or attenuates human well-being. Dignity is antecedent to rights. Not vice versa.) I was questioning how someone of your worldview can explain the phenomenon of human dignity. Simply saying it’s in your Constitution is insufficient, young lady.

    So where do these responsibilities you speak of come from? Do not all responsibilities create correlative rights, which in turn, are rooted in human dignity. Give me a plausible explanation of how one reconciles your ontology of human responsibilities with a Nietzchean worldview? And why should I subordinate self-will to some alleged responsibilities proffered by one of the weaker of the species?

    You can save your personal concerns for true confession time.

  • Dmwangi

    ‘p.s. “My wife wouldn’t like this but perhaps instead of AA and BEE, government should put a quash to racial categories once and for all by promoting interracial canoodling.” – of course your wife would not like that – it makes you sound like a real loser.

    Our government has more important stuff to do than chatting up romantic partners for you!

    Grow some balls II – do your own sweet talking.’

    Geez, Maggs. I offered a suggestion in jest. Why so serious? While government does have better things to do, sadly, it will probably fixate on something just as crass.

  • Dmwangi

    Alibama: You misattributed that quote to me. But enjoy your market fundamentalism.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Dmwangi
    February 11, 2012 at 17:20 pm

    LOL Dm,

    I did not really mean that you and Brett shack up – we still need him for a while yet, as our GENOCIDE early warning system.

    On the other hand, if you need to pass the time while in transit, he can probably be freed up for a short while!

    :P

  • Dmwangi

    Hi Maggs,

    I actually thought you were implying Brett likes African women, as I envisaged effectuating a non-racial society via procreation, not homosexual coupling.

    Sorry to disappoint you.

  • sirjay jonson

    @Lisbeth: you’ve obviously never lived in the norther climes. 0 degrees is freezing, as in water becomes ice… or snow, depending on where the moisture finds itself. Obviously you don’t live in Sutherland or you would be aware of this.

  • sirjay jonson

    ozoneblue
    February 10, 2012 at 23:32 pm

    Not sure why I don’t understand all the conflicting statements you make. Are you aware that much of what you say conflicts with what you are saying? I suppose a simpler way of saying what I’m trying to describe is that its difficult to pin you down with respect to your beliefs, as in unresolved questions within yourself which you still likely harbour. Regardless, keep on keeping on.

  • sirjay jonson

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 10, 2012 at 22:47 pm

    Are you suggesting that it is difficult, if not impossible under the ANC hegemony, to identify ‘best man/woman’ for the job. I suppose I can understand that.

  • sirjay jonson

    Dmwangi
    February 10, 2012 at 22:44 pm

    Women being inferior. Better chat with Tutu about that, and if there’s a woman in your life, I pity you… you got a comeuppance coming.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    sirjay jonson
    February 11, 2012 at 22:41 pm

    Sirjay,

    Do tell how you would select the “best person for the job”.

    If it’s confusing understanding my question, perhaps ask Dmwangi for some guidance.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    p.s. Sirraj, “0 degrees is freezing” is for pure water. And hot water freezes faster than cold water.

    Meat freezes well below that – around -15C.

    Now say sorry to Lisbeth!

  • sirjay jonson

    Brett Nortje
    February 10, 2012 at 21:19 pm

    November, December Cdn winter weather in the high Rockies is and was great and also typical, snow coasting off the peaks, clean, crystal beauty at its best. January weather, Febuary as well, is rather fierce at those altitudes although on the western coast where you descend thousands of meters into lotus land, as in the the Fraser valley leading to the Pacific, the flowers appear as I speak in mid Feb in Victoria. Been back for six weeks. No frost bite acquired there in my gluttonous enjoyment, but the racist confusion here tends to frost me even under the hot Koo summer sun.

  • sirjay jonson

    Not to complain Brett: Bulls won ably today, and super rugby just around the corner, Proteas in New Zealand for 5 weeks… so I’m happy.

  • sirjay jonson

    OK Maggs. Herewith: ‘sorry Lisbeth’. However, in Canada if its even a degree below freezing you can hang your fresh meat in a tree, and I assure you it freezes. Brett would understand.

    Meanwhile I’ll check my numerous freezers, food security program et al, with my thermometer and check that its running according to your and Lisbeth’s advice.

  • sirjay jonson

    Maggs: Its probably neither here nor there as they say, however. If you for example were alone and had broken your leg somewhere in the mountains on a winter eve, the temp is -1 or -3 and you have no protection but the snow to cover yourself with. If you did not burrow into the snow you would not survive the night.
    By morning if you lay unconscious on top of the snow, you would have frozen to death, solid as a rock, as they say.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Dmwangi
    February 11, 2012 at 20:10 pm

    Hey Dmwangi,

    What say you about these rent-seeking Indians, eh?

    Should we invoke the spirit of Idi Amin to scare the shit out of them?

    This strategic role will make Gigaba arguably the most powerful man in the land. Watch the queue outside his door grow. He should expect lots of dinner, Sunday lunch and religious feast invitations from the Gupta family.

    http://www.timeslive.co.za/sundaytimes/2012/02/12/the-real-unspoken-story-of-the-state-of-the-nation-speech

    p.s. “Sorry to disappoint you” – I am indeed very disappointed that you have jilted Brett, especially since he can be a real pain in the butt!

    Your brilliant plan to get government to help you “redistribute Blackness” by diluting Whiteness, won’t go down well – Jimmy Myani was heard saying “Super-concentrating Coloureds, nxa!”.

  • ozoneblue

    sirjay jonson
    February 11, 2012 at 22:38 pm

    “Are you aware that much of what you say conflicts with what you are saying?”

    What is so “conflicting” in what I say. I want my kids to grow up in a social democratic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_democracy), non-racial state.

    I thought it is perfectly clear after having read and understood the letter and the spirit of Freedom Charter? Let me post the link for confused people like you and others in here one more time.

    http://www.anc.org.za/show.php?id=72

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 12, 2012 at 8:17 am

    Hey OB,

    You’re looking at the old Freedom Charter.

    The new one has a few changes.

    Here’s some :

    that our people have been robbed of their birthright to land, liberty and peace by a shall form of government founded on injustice and inequality;

    – Rent and prices shall be lowered, food plentiful and no-one shall go hungry;people shall drink champagne through the lips of their leaders

    – Slums shall be demolished, and new suburbs built where all have transport, roads, lighting, playing fields, creches and social centres;

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 12, 2012 at 8:15 am

    “He should expect lots of dinner, Sunday lunch and religious feast invitations from the Gupta family.”

    Excellent example of more shameless race-baiting and xenophobia in the public discourse where it has become acceptable to target and to vilify ethnic/cultural minorities as long as it is a black man doing it. Had those evil Guptas or Maharajs had surnames like Oppenheimer, Rupert, Motsepe or Sexwale no such a grant fuss would have been made of it.

    You should be fucking ashamed of yourself.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 12, 2012 at 8:46 am

    Hey OB,

    “You should be fucking ashamed of yourself.”

    If I was in South Africa I would have been ashamed of myself – I would have been so ashamed that I would have thought of committing suicide.

    Luckily I took your advice and “fucked off BACK to India” to be with 1.2 billion other “coolies”.

    In India we don’t feel ashamed about anything – we just sit and eat bunny chows. Sometimes we phone our friends.

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 12, 2012 at 8:31 am

    Have you seen this bit.

    “Education shall be free, compulsory, universal and equal for all children; Higher education and technical training shall be opened to all by means of state allowances and scholarships awarded on the basis of merit;”

    Higher education shall be opened on the BASIS OF MERIT and as such not only to the students from the top 30 model-C and private schools. What does your UCT’s CRT dogma say about that nasty White racist word “merit”.

    “CRT also rejects the traditions of liberalism and meritocracy.”

    http://spacrs.wordpress.com/what-is-critical-race-theory/

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 12, 2012 at 8:53 am

    I would say it is good thing that you fucked off back to India. Last thing we need are racist Indians advocating xenophobia and self-annihilation in order to fidn favor and seek rent beyond their racially allocated quotas.

  • ozoneblue

    Can xenophobia be a symptom of a public political discourse dominated and fixated in RACE?

    “Possible xenophobic attacks in Welkom
    2012-02-05 17:22

    Welkom – Welkom police arrested 43 people last week following public violence and looting linked to unemployment protests, Free State police said on Sunday.

    Of those arrested, 34 were found in possession of stolen property after shops in Thabong were looted four nights in a row, spokesperson Warrant Officer Malebo Khosana said in a statement. The businesses targeted were mostly owned by Bangladeshis and Khosana said xenophobia could not be ruled out. “We will do everything in our power to ensure that all those who were involved in these criminal acts are brought to book and our courts will deal with them harshly.””

    Bangladeshis targeted.

    How long before Jimmy Manyi and the lumpenproletariat unite in their fascist ideology?

    http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Possible-xenophobic-attacks-in-Welkom-20120205

  • Brett Nortje

    http://afrikaans.news24.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Oorlog-tussen-Mdluli-en-Cele-20120212

    Oorlog tussen Mdluli en Cele
    2012-02-12 08:15

    Adriaan Basson

    Johannesburg – ’n Tweestryd om die beheer van misdaadintelligensie woed tussen twee van die land se top-polisiemanne.

    Luidens dokumente in Rapport se besit is die geskorste lt.genl. Richard Mdluli oortuig dat genl. Bheki Cele deel is van ’n komplot om hom uit die kussings te lig.

    Daar word voorspel dat Mdluli polisiehoof sal word as Cele, wat ook geskors is, deur ’n kommissie van ondersoek na die huurtransaksies van miljoene rande waarby hy betrokke is, skuldig bevind en uitgeskop word.

    Daarby het Mdluli glo pres. Jacob Zuma se guns gewen toe hy verlede jaar ’n geheime inligtingsverslag voorberei het waarluidens ’n invloedryke groep ANC-politici, gelei deur Tokyo Sexwale, die minister van huisvesting, saamgesweer het om Zuma op die ANC se ­Man­gaung-konferensie in Desember te ontsetel.

    Dit blyk nou Mdluli meen Cele, wat ook as deel van die anti-Zuma-groep in sy verslag genoem word, is besig met ’n veldtog om hom uit die polisie geskop te kry.

    Die veldtog het volgens Mdluli selfs ’n naam: Projek Libambe Lin­ga­sho­ni – Mdluli se prokureur vertaal dit as: “Kom ons voer ’n meedoënlose stryd om seker te maak hy oorleef nie.”

    Maar Cele het aan Rapport gesê hy weet niks van ’n verslag nie. “Wie het ’n ondersoek aangevra?”

    Mdluli is op die punt om ’n terugkeer te maak nadat Cele hom in Maart verlede jaar geskors het hangende ’n ondersoek na ’n moordklag teen hom. Die moordklag is later laat vaar.

    Mdluli beskuldig Cele daarvan dat hy sy “gesag en invloed misbruik”. Cele het aan Rapport gesê hy is “regskundig ongeletterd” en hy gaan “beslis nie reageer” op Mdluli se bewerings in prokureursbriewe nie.

    Mdluli is in September ook van korrupsie en bedrog aangekla, maar die nasionale vervolgingsgesag (NVG) het op omstrede wyse albei sake laat vaar ná vertoë deur Mdluli se regspan.

    Die vertoë, wat in Rapport se besit is, toon dat Mdluli se argumente om hom uit die verknorsing te kry, hoofsaaklik bestaan uit twee dele: Eerstens dat hy die slagoffer is van ’n sameswering tussen Cele, hoë polisieoffisiere, die reservis Paul O’Sullivan en die media; tweedens dat daar geen bewyse is om hom met die moordsaak te verbind nie.

    In sy vertoë het Ike Motloung, Mdluli se prokureur, beweer daar is ’n “sameswering tussen sekere wetstoepassingsagente en hul makkers”.

    Oor Cele het hy die volgende gesê: “Rakende bogenoemde veldtog is dit betekenisvol dat die nasionale polisiehoof nie gehuiwer het om ons ­kliënt kennis te gee van voorneme om hom te skors nie – feitlik on­mid­del­lik nadat hy gearresteer is en terwyl hy nog in aanhouding was.”

    Hy sinspeel daarop dat Cele teenoor Mdluli opgetree het om O’Sullivan tevrede te stel.

    Sonder om voorbeelde te gee beskuldig Mdluli die ondersoekspan van die Valke daarvan dat hulle bewyse teen hom “versin en manipuleer” en dat dit tot ’n onregverdige verhoor sal lei.

    Brig. Lindela Mashigo, polisiewoordvoerder, sê die polisie is nie betrokke by Mdluli se vertoë nie. “Ons het geen kommentaar nie, behalwe om aan te dui dat ’n interne proses aan die gang is om werksake te hanteer wat (Mdluli) raak.”

    O’Sullivan kon nie vir kommentaar bereik word nie.

    Ondersteuners van die vername bedrog-aanklaer adv. Glynnis Breytenbach glo sy word nou deur die NVG geteiken omdat sy aangedring het om met Mdluli se korrupsiesaak voort te gaan.

    Breytenbach het verlede week ’n kennisgewing ontvang van haar werknemer se voorneme om haar te skors.

    Sy is nog nie amptelik geskors nie en die afgelope week het haar prokureur die NVG gewaarsku dat optrede teenoor haar ’n kwaadwillige poging is om vervolgingsbesluite te beïnvloed.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 12, 2012 at 9:07 am

    Hey OB,

    “I would say it is good thing that you fucked off back to India. Last thing we need are racist Indians advocating xenophobia and self-annihilation in order to fidn favor and seek rent beyond their racially allocated quotas.”

    You’re just jealous that my 9 year old son made CAPTAIN of the PROVINCIAL team!

    And racial quotas are only for WHITE people!

    p.s. What do you think of Dmwangi’s plan to nationalise and redistribute WHITE women?

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 12, 2012 at 14:54 pm

    “p.s. What do you think of Dmwangi’s plan to nationalise and redistribute WHITE women?”

    What I’m to think about your retarded racist jokes? I guess if I was racist bigot like yourself I would give a fuck about what “WHITE women” does.

    Now tell us what you think of the Indian nationalists that are running around beating up on journalists. Sounds bit like your fascist hero Juliass Malema doesn’t it.

    BBC journalist’s ‘typically Indian’ beating

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-16947763

  • Lisbeth

    sirjay –

    “… you’ve obviously never lived in the norther climes …”

    Oh yes, I have. I grew up in the European North, where I walked 5 km to school and back in winter temperatures of down to -20°C and worse.

    A household freezer should be set at a minimum of -18°C.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 12, 2012 at 15:34 pm

    Hey OB,

    “Now tell us what you think of the Indian nationalists that are running around beating up on journalists.”

    Pah – Amateurs!

    The Indian okes are involved in a brawl over a block of flats.

    Now this is worth beating journalists up for!

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/greenslade/2010/may/04/theindependent-general-election-2010

    Here’s how it should be done.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tH-DNkKj9sY

  • Brett Nortje

    Bwahahaha!

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ OB

    “We don’t want another Zaire, Zimbabwe or Uganda – we want a Cuba …”

    Yes let’s be Cuba – just, please, without putting gays in concentration camps and our war heroes in front of firing squads!

    Thanks a lot.

  • Brett Nortje

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com says:
    February 11, 2012 at 16:47 pm

    Maggs, this is perhaps the most important comment on this blog – and you allowed your silly azz to be change-agented, your child-like attention to be diverted. By typical puerile Maggs/Dworky puerile fillibustering – used against the ‘expert’.

    Now why would JZ 783 be intimidated by the final-instance powers of constitutional review?

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    Dmwangi/Lisbeth:

    “You go to women? Forget not thine whip!”

    – Freddy.

  • Dmwangi

    Mikhail:

    Please give the entire quote:

    ‘[E]verything about woman has one solution: pregnancy… Man should be educated for war, and woman for the recreation of the warrior; all else is folly… Let woman be a plaything… The happiness of man is: I will. The happiness of woman is: he wills… You are going to woman? Do not forget the whip!’

    -Thus Spoke Zarathustra

    So Lisbeth, my Nietzschean lesser, when can we meet?

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Brett Nortje
    February 12, 2012 at 22:03 pm

    Hey Goofy,

    “Now why would JZ 783 be intimidated by the final-instance powers of constitutional review?”

    Since when is JZ bothered by “constitutional review”.

    He’s been outsmarting the best that the legal system has thrown at him for a long while yet.

    And he’s got the JSC loaded with his puppets.

    Note too that no one of any material stature has applied for the vacancy on the CC.

    There are more vacancies on the horizon.

    Guess who is likely to be the next National Commissioner of SAPS?????

  • ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com
    February 12, 2012 at 22:25 pm

    “Note too that no one of any material stature has applied for the vacancy on the CC.

    There are more vacancies on the horizon.”

    “Material stature”. Is that the new PC codeword for that ugly racist White concept of merit? How about your son or yourself – surely if you two are black enough to walk into provincial cricket teams sitting on the CC should be a walk in the park.

  • ozoneblue

    Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder
    February 12, 2012 at 22:01 pm

    Oh I forgot. If it ain’t pink it has got to stink.

    Castro champions gay rights in Cuba

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7314845.stm

  • Dmwangi

    On Cuban homosexuals:

    ‘The proposed legislation… would give transsexuals the right to free sex-change operations.’

    Brilliant! Forget other priorities like education, housing and health care, we must provide the confused any avenue to self-expression they wish.

    Send them to ingcibi with R100 and a bottle of scotch.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 12, 2012 at 22:50 pm

    OB,

    “surely if you two are black enough to walk into provincial cricket teams sitting on the CC should be a walk in the park.”

    Pah!

    You’re just envious that my 11 year old has achieved more than you did.

    Were you ever CAPTAIN of a cricket team?

    Any cricket team, leave alone the PROVINCIAL side!

  • ozoneblue

    Dmwangi
    February 12, 2012 at 23:16 pm

    Tel Aviv has become the gay capital of the world. There are beautiful ethnically cleansed beaches far removed from the homophobic Palestinian squatter camps.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Dmwangi
    February 12, 2012 at 22:20 pm

    Hey Dm,

    “-Thus Spoke Zarathustra”

    Impressive quotes on women, Dm.

    I got a few of my own

    “Son, when a woman says nothing’s wrong, it means everything’s wrong. When a woman says that everything’s wrong, it means everything’s wrong. And when a woman says that something isn’t funny, you’d better not laugh your ass off.” –

    Thus spoke Homer (Simpson).

    p.s. Got one for OB too.

    “Beer reduces your skill. If you have ever played with a hangover you know what alcohol can do to your cricket performance. Add to that the dehydration that occurs while drinking and you could find yourself losing stamina too.” Homer.

  • Dmwangi

    Er…. Ethnically cleansed?

    Somehow I don’t think the plight of the Palestinians is the result of their traditional sexual mores.

    And we shall see how long that homosexual paradise lasts. Demographics, as they say, is destiny. Compare Palestinian and Israeli birth rates.

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Dmwangi
    February 12, 2012 at 23:35 pm

    Hey Dm,

    Will you go to Zimbabwe and help these guys?

    Ozone Guy can assist you.

    WATER Resources Development and Management Minister Samuel Sipepa Nkomo had a Senate Committee on Gender and Development in stitches when he alleged that mermaids were preventing Government officials from installing water pumps at dams in Gokwe and Mutare. …

    We even hired whites thinking that our boys did not want to work but they also returned saying they would not return to work there again,” he said.

    Minister Nkomo said it was necessary to brew traditional beer and carry out any rites to appease the spirits.

    http://www.herald.co.zw/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=32755:mermaids-stopping-govt-work-sipepa-nkomo&catid=38:local-news&Itemid=131

  • ozoneblue

    Zambia becomes African football champions for the first time ever beating Ivory Coast in penalty shootout 8-7.

    Well done!

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    ozoneblue
    February 12, 2012 at 22:50 pm

    Hey OB,

    There’s hope for White people yet.

    See above – White people are good for scaring the mermaids at the water pumps.

  • Brett Nortje

    Maggs’ Silly Left dreams of beneficiation takes another hit!

    http://www.businessday.co.za/articles/Content.aspx?id=164745

    PETER BRUCE: The Thick End of the Wedge — The Editor’s Notebook
    Beneficiation, like any other business, is great if you can do it profitably

    PETER BRUCE
    Published: 2012/02/13 07:37:44 AM

    I THOUGHT President Jacob Zuma did a decent job on Thursday night last week, delivering his state of the nation address. He very clearly laid out some interesting plans to improve our economic infrastructure and, though most were repackaged old projects, it seems he gets the argument for creating a good physical base for business. A lot of what he said was cynical, particularly when he congratulated the unions for getting teachers back to school. This in the face of a teachers’ strike for the first month of the school year in the Eastern Cape. But it’s an election year and we shouldn’t expect him to be brave. Infrastructure keeps everyone happy.

    Nonetheless that night I found myself cast on TV as an opponent of one of the main legs of African National Congress (ANC) industrial policy — the drive to beneficiate our minerals in the belief that this is a good way to create jobs.

    After some introspection it turns out that, well, actually, I am. Sort of.

    Beneficiation, like any other business, is great if you can do it profitably.

    But the 2012 SA beneficiation brigade believes that if only we could turn the platinum or gold we dig out of our ground into catalytic converters and wedding rings we would somehow all be OK. “Adding value” has become the rhythmic chant of the South African Left. If only they could hear themselves.

    Even the frequently sane mines minister wants a tax on minerals leaving our shores “insufficiently” beneficiated. The immediate question is who should do the beneficiating. The mines should become jewellery houses and catalytic converter manufacturers? We will somehow create a whole new industrial economy driven by such manufacturers?

    Not in a thousand years. At least, viewed optimistically, implicit in Zuma’s speech was a critical recognition — that we are what we are. We’re miners and, as I have said before, farmers. His infrastructure will be there to export our minerals and processed foods as efficiently and cheaply as possible. That was always Thabo Mbeki ’s resolve.

    But in the great debates that rage around us, that is forgotten. So much so that Zuma ministers like Ebrahim Patel or Rob Davies spend their time trying to re-imagine the entire economy, to create industries and expertise that we have never had and at which a string of countries are already better and more efficient than us.

    I think that’s partly a measure of how much people in and around the ANC really despise the business establishment they inherited in 1994. They would rather cut off the proverbial nose than see the obvious staring them in the face.

    Instead of co-opting established business and industry, they prefer to circumvent it

    We already beneficiate our minerals and have for years. Coal into electricity. Gold into bullion. Iron ore into pellets. And we refine all our manganese. We used to refine zinc but state-sanctioned electricity pricing has made it untenable. And, reasonably, what we can’t sell here we export. To expect miners to supply cheap feedstock to a new generation of fanciful industries is to risk their profitability (and the taxes they pay and the jobs they maintain) on an ideological and nationalistic gamble.

    Resource nationalism is not a bad thing. Industrial nationalism is idiotic. Do we really think we can beat the Germans or Chinese at catalytic converters, the Indians at gold jewellery, the Italians or Turks at white goods?

    Instead, we should be the mining technology suppliers to the world. Mining gave birth to all South African manufacturing and we’ve let others run away with it. Why are we not fighting to get that back first? A hatred of the past is clouding our vision, that’s why.

    The one minister who sees this relatively clearly is Trevor Manuel , but he is forced to contort everything he says to make it seem as if his National Development Plan, Patel’s National growth Path and Davies’s Industrial Policy Action Plan (mark two) are somehow seamlessly joined. They aren’t. In many instances they contradict one another.

    Zuma needs to choose. Stick Manuel and an increasingly plausible Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba together and let them get on with it. “Transform” industry all you want, but, please, mine more and faster and ship what we mine cheaper and faster. And let’s fight for our industrial heritage.

  • Gwebecimele

    Damn Lies Statistics.
    Brett, I hope this has nothing to do with you.

    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71619?oid=279822&sn=Detail&pid=71616

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Maggs

    “Were you ever CAPTAIN of a cricket team?”

    I was excluded from Vanjerrpalshk finals by a cartel of Croatian RACISTS.

    WDYS?

  • Jama ka Sijadu

    Gwebecimele says:
    February 13, 2012 at 10:37 am

    “In 2000, the average black South African earned 15% of the average white South African’s income, whereas in 2011, a typical black person earned 40% of a typical white person’s income.”

    Does this look like equality?

  • Maggs Naidu – maggsnaidu@hotmail.com

    Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder
    February 13, 2012 at 13:40 pm

    Dworky,

    “I was excluded from Vanjerrpalshk finals by a cartel of Croatian RACISTS.”

    My 10 year old is better than you!

    He’s CAPTAIN of the PROVINCIAL team.

  • Lisbeth

    Dmwangi –

    “Do not forget the whip”

    Please do not make fun of me or Nietzsche. We Germans have a very dark side to us …

    http://www.f-nietzsche.de/lou1_e.htm

  • Lisbeth

    Brett Nortje –

    Peter Bruce says: “Do we really think we can beat the Germans or Chinese at catalytic converters …?”

    Funny, that – Germany is one of the biggest importers of catalytic converters MADE IN SOUTH AFRICA … and the twit doesn’t know it?

  • Brett Nortje

    Here’s Business Day’s email address:

    busday@bdfm.co.za

    I think you should spank him!

  • ozoneblue

    Dmwangi
    February 12, 2012 at 23:35 pm

    “Demographics, as they say, is destiny. Compare Palestinian and Israeli birth rates.”

    A couple of years back as a ‘White liberal’ in South Africa I would have taken exception to that.