Constitutional Hill

Outcry about police brutality sheer hypocrisy

Politicians, the leadership of the South African Police Service (SAPS) and many members of the chattering classes claim to be surprised and shocked by video footage showing a man being dragged behind a police vehicle. The man (a Mozambican taxi driver) was then allegedly beaten and left to die in a police cell. The only surprising thing about this incidence of police brutality is that the politicians, members of the chattering classes and the SAPS leadership are not congratulating the police on a job well done.

It is reported that Mozambican taxi driver Mido Macia lay for hours bleeding to death, alone in a cell at a police station in Daveyton, on the East Rand, without medical attention. For nearly four hours, the 27-year-old — the sole breadwinner for his one-year-old son, Sergio, and 23-year-old wife, Jacquelina – lay dying in a crumpled heap, in his own blood and faeces. His alleged crime: refusing to obey police officers who ordered him to stop blocking traffic with his vehicle in Daveyton township’s main street.

The Presidency issued a statement condemning the brutal killing. “Members of the South African police service are required to operate within the confines of the law in executing their duties. The visuals of the incident are horrific, disturbing and unacceptable. No human being should be treated in that manner,” said President Zuma. National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega also expressed het deep concern about the incident. Her spokesperson Brigadier Phuti Setati, said: “The matter is viewed by the National Commissioner in a very serious light and it is strongly condemned.”

However, as the Council for the Advancement of the South African Constitution (CASAC) pointed out in a submission to the Marikana Commission of Inquiry, under the government of President Jacob Zuma there has been a “deliberate policy” that involves encouraging greater use of force by members of the SAPS. This policy has beens advanced through the promotion of a semi-formal and illegal doctrine of “maximum force”. CASAC points to several statements and actions to back up this claim, pointing to a statement made by the then Deputy Minister of Safety and Security, Susan Shabangu on 9 April 2008 to the effect that:

You must kill the bastards (criminals) if they threaten you or the community. You must not worry about the regulations. I want no warning shots. You have one shot and it must be a kill shot. I want to assure the police station commissioners and policemen and women from these areas that they have permission to kill these criminals. I will not tolerate any pathetic excuses for you not being able to deal with crime, you have been given guns, now use them. If criminals dare to threaten the police or the livelihood or lives of innocent men, women and children, then they must be killed.

Deputy Minister Shabangu’s words were not repudiated by the South African government. In fact on 11 April 2008, two days after Shabangu made this statement, Mr Jacob Zuma (then President of the ANC) said:

If you have a deputy minister saying the kinds of things that the deputy minister was saying, this is what we need to happen. What the deputy minister was saying is: what we are to be doing is dealing with the criminals rather than talking about it.

Minister of Safety and Security Nathi Mthethwa told Parliament’s Select Committee on Security on 12 November 2008 that people involved must be dealt with.

We don’t believe that, when you are faced… with criminals armed with sophisticated weaponry, the police’s task would be to take out some human rights charter. Because we are in the field, we are in the killing field, where criminals are killing law-abiding citizens. Now we are saying to the police that we ourselves have an obligation as well to strengthen the arm of these task forces. So that they are able, on the field, to teach those people a lesson — fight fire with fire. There’s no other way on that.

Soon afterwards, Minister Mthethwa, proposed amendments to Section 49 of the Criminal Procedure Act, the legal provision dealing with the use of lethal force “for arrest”, in order to make it easier for the SAPS to shoot and kill people suspected by the Police of being involved in crime. The amendment to Section 49 that came into force at the end of September 2012, broadened the powers of the police to use lethal force and contributed to an atmosphere of impunity.

In a subsequent press interview Mr Mthethwa also presented the fact that large numbers of police were being killed as one of the reasons why it was necessary to amend Section 49 despite the fact that the law already authorised the use of lethal force in self-defence. As CASAC points out, no evidence has been presented at any point to demonstrate that amending Section 49 will improve the safety of police. “We are at war with criminals,” Mthethwa is quoted as saying.

When Bheki Cele was appointed as National Commissioner of the SAPS in July 2009 he already had a reputation for advocating the aggressive use of force and continued to openly do so during the initial months after he was appointed. CASAC again:

For instance, in an address to the Pretoria Press Club in September 2009, Mr Cele is reported to have said that “criminals were heavily armed with R5 assault rifles” and that “The only language that R5s understand is R5s. The police do not have to think twice and lose their lives”. The statements made by President Zuma at a specially convened meeting [in September 2009] with more than 1000 police station commissioners to the effect that police should not have to fire warning shots when they were faced with an immediate threat to their lives. (President Zuma’s statements reflected his ignorance of the issue. There is no requirement anywhere in South African law or police regulations for warning shots to be fired when facing an imminent or immediate threat to one’s life.)

These were not the only members of government who encouraged the use of maximum force by the SAPS. During this period the then Deputy-Minister of Police, Fikile Mbalula, stated that the SAPS will show “no mercy” to criminals and will be “taking the war to the criminals”. The police should “shoot the bastards” and it was unavoidable that civilians would be killed in the cross-fire between police and criminals.

After a public outcry resulting form the increasing lawlessness of the SAPS, in particular two killings by police during this period — that of Olga Kekana (11 October 2009) and a three year old boy, Atlegang Phalane (7 November 2009) – the government seemed to tone to down its rhetoric. Government ministers began to use less crude rhetoric, but there was no change in the policy to use maximum force. But it continued to be the policy of government to promote more aggressive use of force by the police and this was accompanied by a sharp increase in the number of deaths of people at the hands of the police.

For example in late November 2009 Minister Mthethwa indicated that he maintained the view that what was called for was a “fight fire with fire” approach. A decision was also taken to re-militarise the ranks of the SAPS. The decision was implemented early in 2010.  On 13 September 2012 President Zuma told Parliament that the militarisation of police ranks “had empowered the police to act decisively” and that this had resulted in a lower crime rate.

It was in the wake of this enabling environment that the Marikana massacre took place. No wonder Amnesty International has expressed concerns about police brutality, including torture and extrajudicial killings, in South Africa. Its 2012 annual report documented allegations against the South African police of excessive force, torture, rape and “extrajudicial executions”. There has also been concern about brutal training methods for the police. According to Peter Jordi from the Wits Law Clinic “[Police] Torture is spiralling out of control. It is happening everywhere.” No wonder that the Institute for Security Studies in Pretoria has reported that the number of people shot dead by police doubled in the four years to 2010. Deaths in police custody or resulting from police action numbered 860 in 2009-10, against an average of 695 deaths a year from 2003-2008.

Of course, middle class people who are fearful of crime and do not bear the brunt of the violence and lawlessness of the SAPS, tend to ignore the belligerent statements by politicians and the invisible war on the poor conducted by an insecure, sometimes corrupt, and often badly trained Police Service. It is only when the brutality that has become endemic is captured on video that members of the chattering classes and the politicians who serve their interest suddenly express outrage and shock at the police brutality.

Spare me the hypocrisy.

PS: I borrowed heavily from the excellent CASAC submission to the Marikana Commission of Inquiry when writing this piece.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    “In a subsequent press interview Mr Mthethwa also presented the fact that large numbers of police were being killed as one of the reasons why it was necessary to amend Section 49 despite the fact that the law already authorised the use of lethal force in self-defence.”

    But the lives of police officers are easily expendable, are they not. No bleeding heart White liberal tears over their lot.

  • Pierre De Vos

    Ozoneblue, I normally do not respond to your inane and unreflective comments on the rule that one should not feed the trolls. But as is usually the case when you comment without reading the text properly, you make a false claim. If you did read the text properly, you would have noticed that the original s 49 is not to blame for cop killings as it allowed any cop to use necessary force to defend themselves against dangerous and armed suspects. What is objected to is a culture and a legal regime that allows cops to execute citizens who had not been tried or found guilty of any crime because other cops in other circumstances were killed by armed suspects. If this is viewed as bleeding heart sentiments, I am rather proud of holding these views. Extrajudicial executions by the police was, after all, a hallmark of the late apartheid era. Some of us believe that it is better to move away from that culture and legal regime.

  • Zulani

    Will the video taken by a bystander, be legit evidence?

  • Maggs Naidu – The Lord is my saviour! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Ja ne!

    Biko II?

  • http://marvcbarr.blogspot.com/ Marvin Caldwell-Barr

    I concur with everything you’ve articulated here. Or rather the rational part of me does. But there were times (before I moved to the US) when another part of me approved of “the crude rhetoric” that issued from those in authority. Indeed, there were times when I became so frustrated that the uppermost thought in my mind was: Kill the bastards — kill every last one of them!

    But that was because of the overwhelming crime in the (upmarket) Kempton Park suburb where I lived. In my street alone: a young mother was gang-raped at home, in front of her four small children; a man was garroted to death in his house, his car later found burning in Tembisa township; a woman three houses away was hijacked at gun point as she left for work; a family in their car were followed home from a shop and hijacked, with several shots being fired in front of their terrified children; a teenager was stabbed to death for his mobile phone; a gathering of mourners attending a funeral service at a house were violently robbed; and, I believe, every house was at some time or other burgled (including my own, three times), in some cases while the occupants were inside sleeping.

  • Vuyo

    The results of a public relations government. Shoot, shoot, why think! build, build, the construction companies say so! Wind, wind, aren’t we so green! Pollute, Pollute, the power cuts are neigh! Swallow, swallow, the pandemic shall end! Ignore all the obvious, tweeter requires instant responses, Robbie needs his sound bite! Kill, Kill! LeadSA.
    The reality is that Pierre and company celebrated this right wing tendency towards our polity. At the moment, the ANC is merely a thin crust away from being an example of Tea Party politics. Nonetheless, amazing and brilliant article Pierre. History will recognise you as a voice of sanity in these trying times. The rhinos and abuse of the sacred gender are mere side shows to our real oppression.
    God bless South Africa, and her sons and daughters.

  • Brett Nortje

    This is a well-researched, thoughtful piece and I agree with all of it.

    I know it is aimed at the use of deadly force by the police.

    But you, Pierre, have not yet made the kopskuif that allows you to see that the defining moment where the cops shrugged off the rule of law was when SAP SERVICE middle-manager Director Jaco Bothma decide to institute an unlawful defacto gun ban which earned nudgenudge winkwink approval from the entire Mbeki regime.

    What we need is real hardnosed civilian oversight at the Police Secretariat not loyal and disciplined cadres like Azhar Cachalia.

  • Vuyo

    Dear Marvin Caldwell-Barr,

    And you truly believe that a young father being dragged behind a Toyota or Isuzu will lead to shivers in the thugs spine? The thug laughs, Hennesy on hand. T’is terrible times; surly the end of times.

  • Vuyo

    Brett, you are wrong. What is needed is a common vision in this Republic. An African Dream of some sort. But that would mess with the profits of those who require us to break our realisation of a common unity. Those who desire us to love thine i-phone before we shall think of Sipho’s shared humanity.

  • Vuyo

    Turning and turning in the widening gyre
    The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
    Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
    Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
    The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
    The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
    The best lack all conviction, while the worst
    Are full of passionate intensity.

    Surely some revelation is at hand;
    Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
    The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
    When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
    Troubles my sight: a waste of desert sand;
    A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
    A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
    Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
    Wind shadows of the indignant desert birds.

    The darkness drops again but now I know
    That twenty centuries of stony sleep
    Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
    And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
    Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

  • Brett Nortje

    TouchyFeely doesn’t work, Vuyo. KITA does.

    I agree with you about deflection to shiny things though. Also glad to see you too appreciate WB.

  • Vuyo

    You might just be right Brett. In the wrong way though.

    Regards

  • sirjay jonson

    I note that Vuyo March 1, 2013 at 20:40 pm stated: “History will recognise you as a voice of sanity in these trying times.” I agree.

    However, now 13 years in SA as a Canadian immigrant to the tip of Africa, I have known personally about a dozen SAfricans who have been murdered, and as for other crimes, well that’s almost daily. Whew. Actually amazing for a Cdn farm boy.

    First: Hypocrisy definition: the practice of professing standards, beliefs, etc., contrary to one’s real character or actual behaviour, esp the pretence of virtue and piety.

    In Latin hypocrisy is described in many different ways, as follows:

    dissimulatio: dissimulation, disguise, dissembling, disguising, concealment: simulatio: simulation, pretense, insincerity, false show;
    pietas ficta: praevaricatio: prevarication, duplicity, double-dealing, treachery, dissimulation: pretended sanctity (love this former one), mimicry.

    At the risk of being viewed as a white supremacist, which I don’t believe about myself, having four children of colour and loving the worthy intent of a non racial harmonious rainbow nation in SAfrica, I post the following link for your interest.

    Attention Brett: http://www.thetruthaboutsouthafrica.com/p/white-genocide-in-south-africa.html

    Difficult for me to disagree with it. However, apologies to all sensitive souls.

  • Brett Nortje
  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Vuyo
    March 1, 2013 at 20:48 pm

    ‘Brett, you are wrong. *What is needed is a common vision in this Republic. An African Dream of some sort.*”

    True. I agree.

  • Brett Nortje

    We’ve heard that kind of thing for 18 years while the country has gone from bad to terrible.

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    President Zuma has a plan to urge all stakeholders to convene a forum to assemble an imbizo to consult on a strategic plan to work together on a new policy to improve police training!

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    Maggs, I still don’t understand why everyone focuses on a single incident in Daveyton, yet remains silent on the hundreds who have been brutalized by “Madame” Zille’s provincial police. Can you explain it?

  • http://marvcbarr.blogspot.com/ Marvin Caldwell-Barr

    Vuyo, I was commenting only about how rampant, violent crime in my neighborhood drove me to periodic lapses of irrational thinking during which I savored the thought of cops getting rid of, once and for all, the vicious criminals that were terrorizing law abiding people (give them a taste of their own medicine, if you like).

    But unfortunately, many South African cops are part of the problem and not the solution. So when they get encouraged to fight fire with fire, they think it’s a license to run completely amok.

  • http://marvcbarr.blogspot.com/ Marvin Caldwell-Barr

    Sorry, typo. I meant to write: periodic lapses into irrational thinking.

  • Maggs Naidu – The Lord is my saviour! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder
    March 2, 2013 at 0:03 am

    Ja ne, Dworky,

    I guess that’s our Minister of Police is determined to get to the bottom of this by blocking the o’Regan enquiry – he’s got a plan.

  • anton kleinschmidt

    @ vuyo……good choice……attribution?

    WB Yeats wrote something identical when he penned The Second Coming

  • http://fight4globalhumanrights.blogspot.com Aleisha Singh

    Hi Pierre

    By “members of the chattering classes”, to whom is this reference made? If it is only the “middle class”, I would imagine that members of the “high-earning class” ought to be included because of selective ignorance. By this, I mean that police brutality is only a problem when it does not serve their own interests.

    I believe that the legal right of “innocent until proven guilty” is of course the most important right which has been overseen in the Section 49 amendment. This is especially so when there is no clear definition (practically speaking) nor any specific perimetres laid for the “need” to use excessive (or maximum) force.

    Since before this amendment, as you correctly stated, the police-brutality crisis has been underplayed in the media. After reading your blog article, I am now convinced that the increased rape incidents in South African may also be attributed to the lack of assistance rendered by the police, the fear women (and children) may have of the very people who were trained and appointed to protect them, and the lack of resources available to those women (and children) to protect themselves against such fears.

    If one views the article posted on Sky about this malicious incident, one can see that the world’s view of South Africa (frequently denied by its residents) is now being placed on a black and white grid for its people to see. Reference: http://news.sky.com/story/1058585/south-africa-cops-charged-over-van-man-murder

    Thank you for calling a spade a spade and for speaking honestly about the downplayed hypocrisy that perpetuates our society.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Pierre De Vos
    March 1, 2013 at 17:03 pm

    Fair enough. But the hypocrisy for me is also in this:

    “tend to ignore the belligerent statements by politicians and the invisible war on the poor conducted by an insecure, sometimes corrupt, and often badly trained Police Service.”

    Why are the police force so badly trained and corrupt? You always sidestep this issue, especially when I explain time and again why the civil service has all but collapsed. You simply don’t want to hear this, that it is your AA that you ideologically defend to death, while you keep on blabbering on about “poor service delivery.” A couple of people applying for jobs at the KZN traffic police died during standard testing programme just the other day. All those fancy fighter planes and submarines bought under the arms deal, all crashed or out of repair. Why do you think this is happening, are the police force somehow magically immune or isolated from a national phenomena?

  • faith

    Well said. Police brutality is in part a reaction to the hysteria about crime in this country. Instead of fixing the underlying causes of crime, crime is “fought” with brutality.

  • bob

    Yesterday I was asked by my Nigerian colleagues is the police is really out of control in South Africa. My answer was yes: they are a bunch of murdering thugs only slightly better than the real criminals. They act upon real or perceived offenses with absolute brutality and seem to really believe to be above the law. My Nigerian colleagues were amazed that this could be possible.

    To your comments about hypocresy: you PdV and the rest of the liberal posse have screamed loud and clear that ownership of firearms should be limited to to civilians (all this BS about Pistorius for example). Don’t you see that guns in the hands of citizens is the only thing that stops an out of control government.

    I suggest that you write a piece about the South African legal notion of self defense which basically means that somebody can enter your house, rob you blind and walk out with impunity. Because if you shoot and cannot prove your life was in immediate danger (legal lingo for the criminal to shot first) then you are going down at least for manslaughter.

  • bob

    I actually liked your piece because it was well researched until the last paragraph. Why do you shift the blame. The old regimes never dared to be as murderous as the current one because it had checks in place. The new brave world of South Africa is run by criminal, no redeeming factor.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2013/02/26/sugar-rush-letter-from-cape-town/

    “When you grew up in a country like this, on the oppressor side of the frontier lines, nostalgia can feel a tad morally problematic. What’s that you miss? The eighties? *Oh you liked those, did you*?”

    Yes we did. If it wasn’t for the civil rights movement in USA (those fucking WHITE long-haired dagga smoking hippies) there would be no prez Obama, no prez Mandela today and the world would have been an entirely different place.

    WHITES had just so much to do with cultural revolution and rebellion against “White Supremacy” than any body else. In fact it was Whites who initiated all of that, from Allen Ginsberg, Timothy Leary, Neal Cassady, Ken kesey, Bob Dylan to John Lennon to Bob Marley, Bob Geldof to Bono, not some guilt ridden academic White liberals who do not know how to dance like Africa and with zero-sum, self-hating guilt complex that has become a sort of capital to ultra-elitist White minority entitlement.

  • Brett Nortje

    Very powerfully put, and I do not think your argument will be rebutted soon. You might want to remind everyone of the moratorium on the promotion of whites in the SAPS, The promotion of ‘everybody’ to ‘Inspector’. The embargo on promoting any whites who held the rank ‘inspector’.

    AA and ‘transformation’ chickens coming home to roost.

    The poseur Thabo Mbeki has a lot to answer for. At the count of 3 everyone spit on his name.

    When there is a rejection of the rule of law from the top down in any state organ the lawlessness becomes a culture of lawlessness that is almost impossible to turn around. We all know why the warlords in the ANC would want anarchy in the SAPS and the NPA.

    When there is lawlessness at the bottom in the SAPS hierarchy it is relatively easy to fix. Ill-discipline. A few kicks in the azz.

    Ozoneblue says:
    March 2, 2013 at 12:20 pm

    Why are the police force so badly trained and corrupt? You always sidestep this issue, especially when I explain time and again why the civil service has all but collapsed. You simply don’t want to hear this, that it is your AA that you ideologically defend to death, while you keep on blabbering on about “poor service delivery.” A couple of people applying for jobs at the KZN traffic police died during standard testing programme just the other day. All those fancy fighter planes and submarines bought under the arms deal, all crashed or out of repair. Why do you think this is happening, are the police force somehow magically immune or isolated from a national phenomena?

  • Brett Nortje

    Well I think that went down well, Sirjay, don’t you?

    To understand the reaction of many whites to being confronted with their reality you have to have grown up here. The acquired survival skill of turning one’s head away.

    Yesterday I got jeered twice by black people. Unique experience for me, being jeered, since to know me is to love me. I drove past a pine tree where I saw a lot of needles had fallen and decided my pigeons would love that. I was minding my own business peacably raking them up from the sidewalk when a bakkie drove past slowly full of men on the back who proceeded to jeer and pass comments. Friendly banter, you say? Not with the glares, trying to hold eye-contact as long as possible.

    Then, going home. A taxi was standing on the right side of the slipway. The car in front of me stopped right next to it. Both on yellow lines. When I hooted at these morons illegally obstructing the road all the black people standing on the pavement started jeering and waving me away.

    All around there are signs of increased tension, people gritting their teeth at each other.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Brett Nortje
    March 3, 2013 at 8:43 am

    “Very powerfully put, and I do not think your argument will be rebutted soon. You might want to remind everyone of the moratorium on the promotion of whites in the SAPS, The promotion of ‘everybody’ to ‘Inspector’. The embargo on promoting any whites who held the rank ‘inspector’.”

    Correct. And that ‘transformation” was forced through by one Jackie Selebi – Friend of the Mafia, a criminal that aught to be in jail himself. If that is your Commissioner of Police then what do you expect from the rest of the force?

  • Maggs Naidu – Lord have mercy on us for we know not what we do! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Ramaphosa – he who would be king!

    Is the 21 century, post-apartheid South Africa’s 3rd and 4th decade of governance gonna be the decades of really fucking dumb and even dumber?

    • “We also need to be the moral conscience of our country when it comes to respect for women and acting against rapists. We as Christians need to become the moral conscience of our country,”

    • “If you believe and I believe / And we together pray / The Holy Spirit must come down / And Africa will be saved.”

    • “This country requires leadership. It requires its consciousness to be raised.”

    • “There is no better agent than Christians and the church to raise the morals, the moral consciousness of our nation”

    • “It falls on us as Christians. We must say this is a sin. This is a crime. Rape is a sin and it is a crime.”

    • “We are the ones as ­Christians who must stand up and say, corruption, we will never ­accept it, because it is a sin. It is a crime.”

    • “Ramaphosa also urged the ­congregation to read the National Development Plan and know it as well as they do the Constitution.”

    • “Ramaphosa also urged the ­congregation to read the National Development Plan and know it as well as they do the Constitution.”

    • “It is only then that we can say to politicians, you are not doing things correctly because we are playing our part. I always say to people: ‘You do your job, I do mine”

    • He said the church was in the ANC’s “DNA” and the reason the party still had the position of chaplain-general in its office was to ensure that “the ANC stays close to God’s light” and does ­everything “in accordance with what God prescribes”.

  • Maggs Naidu – Lord have mercy on us for we know not what we do! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)
  • Spuy Sebotsa

    Trust Racists to reduce this to “AA” and “non promotion of whites” problem, as if white police officers are not BY FAR the most brutal if anything!
    Anyway Prof whilst I agree with your piece 100%, you ll also have to agree that the decline in violent crime (according to recent SAPS stats) is largely as a result of the very crude rhetoric from authorities. So, the real COMPLEX question is how do you create a balance?..do you speak ‘politically correct’ about violent crime as leaders and risk being taken for granted by criminals OR do you use crude rhetoric and be seen as condoning police brutality??
    I just think its equally unfair to pretend as if this is a simple debate for a country that is ranked highest in crime!

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Spuy Sebotsa
    March 3, 2013 at 13:54 pm

    “Trust Racists to reduce this to “AA” and “non promotion of whites” problem, as if white police officers are not BY FAR the most brutal if anything!”

    Trying to divert from the issues intimidating and calling people “racist” is not going to work any more. The facts and effects are there for everybody to see, you can try and run away from it, deny it, stick your head in the sand but it will not change a thing. We all know what is going on in this country.

    “As it happened, the applicant was not the only unsuccessful candidate who was unhappy with the process. Both Venter and a Captain Beukes also challenged their non-appointments to the post as unfair labour practices. Their awards were referred to in the course of the evidence, but for the purposes of this matter, only Venter’s award is of interest. In the case of Venter, she challenged the procedural irregularities of the process. It appears from the award that despite being rated most highly her name was removed from the short list of candidates because of a directive received from Head office during the process to the effect that the racial representivity after the first selection process did not achieve a high enough level, and needed to be improved. The award records the initial racial representivity level of recommended candidates to have been 59%, which then rose 70% after candidates like Venter were removed from the running. Although the award does not specifically mention the designated categories referred to under the term ‘representivity’ it appears to have concerned the ratio of black to white recommended candidates, where ‘black’ candidates included black, Indian and coloured candidates. This would be in accordance with other policy documents presented in the matter before me.”

    “Thus, apart from a built-in weighting for affirmative action purposes, which allowed individual candidates to be compared with each other, it appears that the employer had adopted the view that every round of appointments had to reflect the ratios it was striving for, irrespective of the outcome of the weighted assessment process. One consequence of this approach meant that an individual candidate’s chances of appointment would not depend solely on an already weighted assessment process of the suitable candidates, but would be subject to an override having the result that otherwise successful candidates in the assessment process could be removed from contention until the desired racial ratio was achieved. As a result, if the outcome of the two stage assessment process resulted in recommended appointments of say 4 white candidates and 6 black candidates, one of the white candidates could be substituted with a previously unsuccessful black candidate to achieve the desired white:black ratio of 30:70.”

    http://www.saflii.org.za/za/cases/ZALCJHB/2012/123.html

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    “it appears that the employer had adopted the view that every round of appointments had to reflect the ratios it was striving for, *irrespective of the outcome of the weighted assessment process.*”

    In other words, qualifications, experience, performance, i.e. merit played NO ROLE.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    LOL@Spuy!

    Who is to blame for 2,8% conviction rates for rape and 1% for trio crimes and 13% (Which I ???) for murder?

    The real complex question is why the murder rate is coming down? (Lets remind everyone first it is not coming down as quickly as it could have!)

    I say it is because a million black people now have licenced handguns and mugging them for a wallet is not such an easy proposition anymore.

    While we are on the topic of tsotsis the tsotsis who used to moonlight as enforcers for the ANC and smuggle guns and mandrax down south gold&diamonds east and stolen cars and luxuries for the ANC in exile north probably felt the ravages of AIDS first. Others are probably representing the ANC in all branches of government and the legislatures.

    Mapantsulas!

    Spuy Sebotsa says:
    March 3, 2013 at 13:54 pm

    “Trust Racists to reduce this to “AA” and “non promotion of whites” problem, as if white police officers are not BY FAR the most brutal if anything!
    ….
    So, the real COMPLEX question”

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    OBS, can you confirm for us that the first thing Tlokwe Mayor Maphetle did upon repo-ing the gold chain is set off after the custom wa-Benz the DA had sent back to maker?

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 3, 2013 at 15:21 pm

    “Who is to blame for 2,8% conviction rates for rape and 1% for trio crimes and 13% (Which I ???) for murder?”

    Brett. The minister of Public (Do not) Works will tell you the same.

    “South Africa’s professional engineering councils, who were branded as racist gatekeepers in recent parliamentary public hearings, are warning the minister of public works that if bridges start to collapse she will be the one facing legal action. Transformation is at the heart of a dispute between South Africa’s professional engineering councils and the Department of Public Works over the Built Environment Bill. The professional engineering bodies are suspicious of the broad powers that the Bill gives to Public Works Minister Thoko Didiza and believe that the department wants to do away with the peer review system, which is used to register engineers and could lead to South Africa losing international recognition for its professionals. The Department of Public Works wants to streamline the registration process for the built environment professions as they feel that there are not enough previously disadvantaged individuals entering the system and there is a view that white professionals who run the industry councils are acting as gatekeepers.”

    http://mg.co.za/article/2008-09-01-engineers-warn-minister

    You see it is us, the “racist” gatekeepers, who insist on competence, professionalism and ethical conduct that are the problem – and then everybody pretend to be oh so surprised when things start falling apart and going to shit, when in fact the system is rigged so that there can be no other logical outcome.

  • Maggs Naidu – Jesus spelled backwards sounds like sausage! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Hey Brett,

    I heard that somewhere.

    WDYSTT?

  • Alibama

    Since you-know-what I haven’t had a TV, but I’m told that the RAND dropped to
    over 9/$1. Hello Zimbo here we come.
    ——————
    When I was in school, we had PROBLEMS that we learned to solve.
    In the next generation of PeeCee talk, problems had been replaced by ISSUES.
    Now Anglo societies have CHALLENGES instead of problems.

  • Chris

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 3, 2013 at 15:21 pm

    Before you ask why the murder rate is coming down you must first ask if the murder rate is really coming down. A senior prosecutor tells me his office receives more murder dockets from certain police stations than the “official” number of murder cases from those stations as reflected in the stats released by the Minister. The only inference is that the official stats released are false.

    Last week my wife was robbed of two cell phones worth R17 000. The police bluntly refused to open a case docket, saying they only make an “occurance book entry” for cell phones. Take note, it wasn’t stolen, she was robbed. No case docket registered, no stats. The police constable was unable to write the statement, so my wife had to write it herself. It was not a student constable, it was a constable. So much for stats, or for the police doing much about crime.

  • joeslis

    Alibama

    “PROBLEMS … ISSUES … CHALLENGES …”

    Hey, Ali … you left out GREEVEANCES!

  • Dmwangi

    No, no. Secularism will sort out all this tape and corruption stuff- yes, Maggs?

    There is no place in modern society for all this superstitious nonsense about “moral values.”

    “Rustenburg – ANC deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa has called on Christians to stand up against rape and corruption.

    Ramaphosa said Christians needed to “become the moral conscience of our country” and act as agents to raise the moral consciousness of the nation.

    He was speaking in Rustenburg at the Pentecostal Holiness Church’s centennial celebrations.

    Ramaphosa told nearly 500 congregants that South Africa was a “Lord-fearing nation, a God-fearing country”.

    “We also need to be the moral conscience of our country when it comes to respect for women and acting against rapists. We as Christians need to become the moral conscience of our country,” he said.

    Ramaphosa, who started and ended his speech with a “hallelujah”, said: “This country cares for the Lord. It recognises the importance of the Lord and the hegemony of the Lord.”

    After saying “hallelujah” at the start of his speech, Ramaphosa broke into a popular Christian song, which has some of the following lyrics: If you believe and I believe / And we together pray / The Holy Spirit must come down / And Africa will be saved.

    Said Ramaphosa: “This country requires leadership. It requires its consciousness to be raised.

    “There is no better agent than Christians and the church to raise the morals, the moral consciousness of our nation,” he said.

    “It falls on us, as Christians. We must say this is a sin. This is a crime. Rape is a sin and it is a crime. We are the ones as ­Christians who must stand up and say, corruption, we will never ­accept it, because it is a sin. It is a crime.””

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Dmwangi
    March 3, 2013 at 19:24 pm

    Dm,

    “No, no. Secularism will sort out all this tape and corruption stuff- yes, Maggs?”

    Don’t be silly DM.

    Next we’ll hear that praying will sort out poverty, racism, homophobia, obesity …

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    See Pierrot’s retweet above, Maggs? Martina Navratilova, expert, says guns are 11 times more blahblahblah.

    What Navratilova is referring to, what Pierre is retweeting approvingly is a US study by Dr David Hemenway which claims this: “Children aged 5 to 14 years in the United States have 11 times the likelihood of being killed accidentally with a gun compared with similarly aged children in other high-income countries” (where presumably handguns are banned.)

    A bit of background on gun control’s sangomas:

    Hemenway often co-authors with Drs. Philip J. Cook and Jens Ludwig. These gents published a study in 1997 sponsored by the Department of Justice. It was called ‘Guns in America: National Survey on Private Ownership and Use of Firearms’ and investigated the defensive use of guns.

    One million, four hundred sixty thousand times a year. The Gun Gestapo say. Cook and Ludwig.

    From 1999 through 2010 there were 669 accidental gun deaths in kids this age group. Hemenway doesn’t compare how many kids died in swimming pools or in car accidents or were beaten to death by their parents.

    But if we wanted to be ghoulish we could all divide 669 dead kids by 11 years by 1 460 000 defensive gun uses per year and come up with a ‘more likely’ statistic of our own.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Lets talk solutions, Chris. How do we fix the criminal justice system? How can anyone argue it is a deterrent with those conviction rates?

    SHould disciplinary hearings into experiences like that of your wife be conducted by community policing forums?

    How is it possible someone like Martin Hood can be arrested by the cops while representing a client? Can anyone pretend the SAPS is a disciplined force?

    WHat I would like to see is the privatisation of prosecution services. Detective services too. The re-introduction of Justices of the Peace.

    These must be some of the most traumatised cops in the world having had to clean up after 500 000 murders. I think self-help groups in the SAPS are a must. I would like to see every beat cop rotated 3 months a year to a job where he can just unwind and relax like teaching kids to drive or swim or supervising playgrounds during break and catching truants. Just be there and be a father figure. I would also like to see training where every cop is taught to drive, basic literacy, and can at least communicate in English Afrikaans Zulu and Sotho.

    How could SAPS standards generating bodies prescribe competency unit standards for the country’s gun owners but not cops on the beat?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Everyone watch Carte Blanche on Medupi?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    You know why so many RDP houses are collapsing, don’t you? You must stop gatekeeping. Everyone is a builder. Illiterates using 4 kruiwas full of building sand to one kruiwa with a bag of cement not being able to work out ‘hey, this kruiwa can take 2 bags of cement so my mix is actually 1:8 not 1:4!’

    Ozoneblue says:
    March 3, 2013 at 15:48 pm

    “South Africa’s professional engineering councils, who were branded as racist gatekeepers in recent parliamentary public hearings, are warning the minister of public works that if bridges start to collapse”

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71654?oid=361742&sn=Detail&pid=71616

    Judicial inquiry needed into police brutality – DA
    Dianne Kohler Barnard
    03 March 2013

    Dianne Kohler Barnard says President needs to tackle causes, not just the symptoms, of SAPS violence

    President Zuma must establish a Judicial Commission of Inquiry into police brutality

    Note to editors: The following statement was distributed in Daveyton today where DA Leader in Gauteng, John Moodey MPL, DA National Spokesperson and Deputy Federal Chairperson, Mmusi Maimane; DA Shadow Minister of Police, Dianne Kohler Barnard MP; DA Constituency Head for Daveyton, Emmah More MP and DA Gauteng Community Safety Spokesperson, Kate Lorimer MPL visited the site where Emidio Macia was brutally assaulted.

    My visit to the scene of where the brutal assault of Emidio Macia took place in Daveyton has saddened and angered me to my core.

    The DA extends its sincere condolences to the family, friends and loved ones of Mr Macia. Our heart goes out in particular to his seven year old son, who was robbed of his father. I cannot imagine the pain and anger he must be feeling today. We share this anger, as do all South Africans who are sick and tired of the abuse at the hands of the South African Police Service.

    How is it that nearly 20 years after the end of the brutal Apartheid regime, where such murders at the hands of the security police were commonplace, we must still grieve as we do today?

    The response by the government and the SAPS has not been good enough. Where is the plan to deal with this problem? Why did the despicable murder of Andries Tatane, and the images of miners being gunned down in cold blood at Marikana not force action? Why have we not de-militarised the police as the National Development Plan demands? Why do Ministers who claim “kill the bastards” still serve in the cabinet? Where is the Minister of Police, Nathi Mthethwa?

    Until such stage as the President tackles the causes, and not just the symptoms, the deaths of every person at the hands of the SAPS will hang over his head. The President, his Minister of Police and his National Commissioner should be ashamed of themselves.

    How can they not be, if one considers the following statistics? In 2011/2012, the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID) received 4 923 complaints in relation to the actions of SAPS members. Of these, 720 were deaths, 88 domestic violence cases, 2 320 allegations of criminal offences and 1 795 misconduct cases. Just this past month, IPID has reported that 3 constables have been arrested for rape.

    There have been a consistently high number of deaths that should years ago have forced SAPS leadership into action.

    In 2006/2008 – 698 deaths
    In 2007/2008 – 792 deaths
    In 2008/2009 – 912 deaths
    In 2009/2010 – 860 deaths
    In 2010/2011 – 797 deaths

    Yet the IPID was only able to recommend 162 death cases and 383 criminal matters for prosecution in 2011/12. In a reply to a parliamentary question last year, Minister Mthethwa revealed that 144 SAPS members had been charged with murder and 91 had been charged with rape in 2011/2012.

    These figures demonstrate a problem of crisis proportions. So why has there not been a commensurate response from the government?

    It is no co-incidence that in 2008, the year in which the most people were killed at the hands of the police, then Deputy Minister of Police, Susan Shabangu told police service members that they must “kill the bastards.” She went on to say, “you must not worry about the regulations. I want no warning shots. You have one shot and it must be a kill shot.”

    Then, instead of acting to professionalise the police, the government militarised it. In 2010, President Zuma supported the re-implementation of the “Apartheid era” military ranks into the police proposed by now disgraced former National Police Commissioner Bheki Cele.

    A year later, the world watched in horror the footage of the murder of Andries Tatane. South Africa’s global reputation for having a brutal police service was cemented last year when images of police opening fire on striking mineworkers were beamed across the world.

    Besides being encouraged to shoot first and not ask questions later, our police officers are clearly not receiving the training necessary to target criminals and protect innocent people. Nor are they receiving adequate disciplinary action for their actions. The sanction for assault, common assault and assault with intent to cause grievous bodily harm ranges from a verbal warning to dismissal or a fine. This allows for a culture of impunity to develop, and indeed acts as a parallel criminal justice system which sees criminal acts by police members dealt with ‘in-house’ instead of in the courts. Indeed, the norm is that SAPS members are rarely suspended on the lead up to a trial where the NPA has determined there is aprima facie case. They are left on duty, fully armed.

    It is time for President Zuma to deal with the causes of police brutality and not just the symptoms. He needs to ascertain precisely what has led to the increase in police brutality under his watch and how best to root it out.

    I have written to President Jacob Zuma today to request that he urgently establishes a Judicial Commission of Inquiry into pervasive police brutality. This Commission must investigate:

    The root causes of the problem;
    The actions of senior leaders within and without the police service which may or may not have encouraged this culture of brutality with impunity within our police service; and
    What can be done to cut out this culture of brutality that has crept into the police service.

    It’s not enough to merely ask questions about specific incidents such as Marikana and Daveyton. This country needs to know there is a plan to ensure they are not repeated over and over again.

    If President Zuma is serious about turning this tragic situation around, he must establish a Commission as a matter of urgency. We need a professional police service to catch violent criminals, not a trigger-happy police force that kills innocent civilians.

    Statement issued by Dianne Kohler Barnard MP, DA Shadow Minister of Police, March 3 2013

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Police stations are running out of the DNA kits used to collect forensic evidence from adult female rape victims and some are having to use expired kits.

    Only a few days ago President Jacob Zuma launched a national “stop rape” campaign in schools following the national outcry about the gang rape, mutilation and murder of 17-year-old Anene Booysen.

    http://www.timeslive.co.za/thetimes/2013/03/04/rapists-could-beat-the-courts

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    The death of Mozambican taxi driver Mido Macia in police custody is the latest incident exposing the culture of violence and impunity in the police. In Ficksburg, Marikana, Cato Manor, Daveyton and other areas where the police acted with excessive brute force, there is a culture of thuggish behaviour borne out of a belief that upholding human rights does not a apply to them and that they are above the Constitution and the law. Breaking this trend will take strong leadership and political will – both of which are lacking. By RANJENI MUNUSAMY.

    http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2013-03-04-licence-to-kill-a-bloody-combo-of-politics-and-policing/

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)
    March 4, 2013 at 8:55 am

    “A senior official responsible for the 51 Thuthuzela care centres – one-stop facilities for rape victims attached to state clinics and hospitals – said the shortage was “a matter of concern”.

    I’m sure it is a “matter of concern”. It being YOUR FUCKING JOB to ensure that proper planning and coordination is done as is expected from a managerial position. But I’m sure you were the best black candidate for the job, perhaps one of the few policemen left who know how to write down a statement.

  • Chris

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR? says:
    March 3, 2013 at 22:07 pm

    Solutions? Bringing back the death penalty will not be any solution to start with. Before penalty comes conviction and without a conviction penalty becomes meaningless. I don’t think the prosecutors are doing so bad, they have a satisfactory conviction rate for the few cases that reaches the courts. The problem lies with the police, an organization that has become totally dysfunctional. To give an example, last year I was in court when a station commander, holding the rank of Colonel, if I remember well, testified and was asked what his duties entailed. The answer was that he had three duties. One, he had to see that the police station was clean. Two, he had to see that there was a CPF. Three, he had to keep certain registers. That was it. Nothing about keeping discipline, checking dockets, ensuring that work is done. The change should start at the top, by replacing the President and his entire cabinet with competent people. I’m afraid that is the only solution.

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Chris
    March 4, 2013 at 9:31 am

    Hayibo Chris!

    “Bringing back the death penalty will not be any solution to start with.”

    How are you proposing that is done?

  • Gwebecimele

    Who let the dogs out!!

    It is very scary when the forces of evil seem to be stronger than the rest of us.

    http://mg.co.za/article/2013-03-03-vavi-i-know-who-is-out-to-get-me

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Chris
    March 4, 2013 at 9:31 am

    This -> “The problem lies with the police, an organization that has become totally dysfunctional.”

    SOLIDARITY stops SAPS affirmative action plan in court

    “The three members, whose joint years of service total more than 80 years, were not considered for promotion because the available positions have been categorised into allocations according to race and gender. Concurrent with this case, Solidarity is also involved in a case against the SAPS in which the court is petitioned to declare invalid the SAPS’s affirmative action plan in its totality. ‘The SAPS ignored this and proceeded with the second phase of promotions according to the new ranking system. This is yet another way in which the SAPS is enforcing quotas in terms of its affirmative action plan based on national race demographics, thereby disregarding experience at the cost of service delivery.’”

    http://www.salabournews.co.za/index.php/press-releases/9541-solidarity-stops-saps-affirmative-action-plan-in-court.html

    They can talk all they wish about human rights, accountability, good policing, etc.etc. buy if they do not address the root of the problem, which is an incompetent and inexperienced police force member, especially in middle/upper level management they will get nowhere. Oh – and perhaps it would also help to appoint a Commissioner of Police who knows something about policing and is not a Friend of the Mafia, or another political motivated appointment because she is a black women.

  • Andrew

    Maggs Naidu – Lord have mercy on us for we know not what we do! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com) says:
    March 3, 2013 at 12:38 pm
    Ramaphosa – he who would be king!

    Dmwangi says:
    March 3, 2013 at 19:24 pm
    No, no. Secularism will sort out all this tape and corruption stuff- yes, Maggs?

    Magg. Lest we forget, some of the biggest marches in CPT during apartheid was led by….Tutu and Boesak and others.

    The church reach a large number of people, who do not read blogs etc. A positive change could be made wrt how men treat their woman if the church agrees that they are our equal and not our possessions as men.

    Imagine for a moment if all churches in SA call for a shutdown of the country on every day that Anene/Reva/Others cases come before court. Nobody go to work, we shut down every major roadway, goverment department, roadway etc. We stage protests at the community level at the police stations saying ‘NO’.

    We mandate Church leaders of the community to negotiate at the community level with police station comanders and demand that they do their job.

    In this way we could multiply the action of section27 CASAC and others on many/all issues.

    The People brought down apartheid, the people can arrest the downward spiral into nothingness

  • Zoo Keeper

    Hi Prof

    I’m with you fully on this one. This happens against a backdrop of the law being set up to defend against the police. The CPA is all about keeping the cops on the straight and narrow.

    It is true that the politico’s have encouraged a degree of behaviour from the cops which not even the Apartheid govt did (at least not openly).

    Of course, the most disturbing bit is that the cops under Apartheid were used as the blunt instrument of oppression. The abuse by the cops then happened against a very different backdrop. We are not fighting each other anymore, we’re just trying to get on with our lives.

    For the police to be encouraged to act against members of the public by the politicians is in fact more disturbing now than it was under Apartheid.

    Judge Dredd is cool – as long as he stays a cartoon!

  • Gwebecimele

    Maggs

    As for “Duty Free Cabinet”, no one has a better job than Martinus Van Schalwyk. Hardly required to campaign, deployed to service delivery protests, NEC participation, hold Nkandla or Private Jet press statements etc even the media forgets him.

  • Gwebecimele
  • Gwebecimele

    http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2013-03-04-maverick-interview-trevor-manuel/

    “Or the fact that the policemen who dragged the poor Mozambican man to his death behind police van. I’ll tell you what outrages me about it. Sky and CNN are showing it, but it does not feature prominently in our local newspapers. It upsets me when we as a nation do not express outrage.

    I’m speaking as a minister and I’m telling you that what outrages me is that they did not dismiss these policemen on the turn. There’s no need to consult the Labour Relations Act. There’s prima facie evidence. You dismiss them on the turn, and you shift the onus onto them. You charge them for the death of this poor man.” Trevor Manuel

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Gwebecimele
    March 4, 2013 at 10:19 am

    Gwebs,

    I’m speaking as a minister and I’m telling you that what outrages me is that they did not dismiss these policemen on the turn. There’s no need to consult the Labour Relations Act. There’s prima facie evidence. You dismiss them on the turn, and you shift the onus onto them. You charge them for the death of this poor man.” Trevor Manuel

    Manuel has finally lost his marbles!

    There is very little difference between this and those who agitated for a more murderous and/or violent SAPS.

    It seems that the rot has affected the entire cabinet!

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Maggs

    “Manuel has finally lost his marbles!”

    Maggs is right. My demand is that these policemen and women be reinstated immediately and allowed to continue protecting us from taxi drivers and other foreigners! I demand that these policemen continue to serve us through their disciplinary hearing, administrative appeals, High Court reviews, and appeals to the SCA and CC. Admittedly this may take five years or so, but we cannot ride roughshod over basis labour law rights just because of populist liberal outrage stirred by the WHITE media!

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Gwebecimele
    March 4, 2013 at 10:19 am

    Of course it must be the individual cops who are to blame. Those who put their lives on the line on a daily basis with very little thanks or pay. That is one thing you can be sure of in the culture of entitlement, there is always somebody else to blame. Most of the time the poor chaps who are actually doing the work.

    But what did Manuel have to say about the Friend of the Mafia running our police?

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)
    March 4, 2013 at 11:54 am

    Well put maggs. After all there is prima facie evidence that Trevor Manuel signed off on a fraudulent arms deal, and he is still on the job!

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder
    March 4, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    Thank you Dworky,

    I am soooooooooooo glad that you concur that it’s idiotic to suggest that we abandon our Constitutional principles and laws merely because we’re deeply disturbed.

    It’s even more idiotic since the suggestion comes from a seasoned Cabinet Minister.

    Note too that Manuel has not once confronted his Cabinet colleagues about their counter-revolutionary utterances, criminal behaviour, greed, laziness …

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)
    March 4, 2013 at 12:20 pm

    Maggs. Do you think there is an emotional/psychological support infrastructure in the SAP to help these guys:

    “‘It’s madness,” said national police commissioner Bheki Cele, shaking his head furiously. “Police officers are fathers, mothers and they have hearts to love. People treat them as if they are ruthless and cold. The number of police already murdered this year is alarming.” Every Saturday for the past five weeks Cele has flown in the country to attend funerals of members of the police killed in the line of duty. This week he flew to Cape Town to visit the devastated families of Warrant Officer Girshwin Matthee (39) and student constable Cannon Cloete (23), who were murdered in the early hours of last Sunday in Wallacedene, a teeming informal settlement in the city’s eastern suburbs. The two men were on patrol when they were approached by a young woman who claimed she had been raped. “She took them to the shack where she said she was raped. As they arrived at the shack, they were both shot in the head. “To me, it appears to be an ambush. Their service pistols were stolen,” Cele said”"

    http://mg.co.za/article/2011-05-27-murders-leave-south-africa-cold

    Perhaps they were not offered an opportunity to fire a warning shot? I know PdV would have done so, after he gave his speeches about gender equality.

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Ozoneblue
    March 4, 2013 at 12:36 pm

    Ozone Guy,

    I dunno how accurate/useful these anecdotes are.

    If two policeman were shot in the head in the ambush then the level of detail leading up to the murder that Cele has is pretty astounding!

  • Anonymouse

    Zulani

    March 1, 2013 at 17:42 pm

    Will the video taken by a bystander, be legit evidence?

    I should think so – If I remember well, it was such a video that sank (or helped sink) Motata J in his ‘intoxicated by tea’ case.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)
    March 4, 2013 at 12:41 pm

    Are you saying those cops who were shot in the head deserved it maggs?

    I wouldn’t know. I bow before your superior knowledge regarding good police work and the environment they have to operate in. BTW – I always try to treat cops with a good measure of respect, have never has any serious problems with them either.

    It is little disconcerting how soon ordinary South Africans are ready to judge those who are tasked with such a difficult job.

  • Anonymouse

    Chris

    March 3, 2013 at 17:03 pm

    I agree in every respect – the police are not dishing up the true stats – My private laptop has been stolen after a burglary, my official laptop stolen from my parked and locked vehicle, my daughter’s laptop stolen from her friend’s vehicle. It was only in the case of the official laptop that the police opened a docket. In the other two instances, they refused – saying that we were insured, we do not know who the cuplrits are (nogal!) and that they do not hane time to carry unsolved dockets for a length of time, they only issued a so-called ‘report number’ for insurance purposes. Basic line – no case reported – no stats.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    And now for something completely different.

    “Israel has been accused of encouraging racial segregation after a new Palestinian-only bus service was launched following objections by Jewish settlers who claimed Arab passengers were “a security risk”.”

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/israel/9906113/Israel-launches-Palestinian-only-buses-amid-accusations-of-racial-segregation.html

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Ozonebloo

    “Israel has been accused of encouraging racial segregation…”

    There is no such state as “Israel.” That is why we progressives call it the “IZE” (Illegal Zionist entity.”)

    Thanks.

  • Gwebecimele

    Maggs

    Here is the joke. In the same article Trevor warns Xingwana.

    Trevor to Lulu

    “Madam, you are outside of the founding provisions of our Constitution. You are outside of the preamble to the Constitution. You can’t make these outlandish statements. It’s wrong.”

  • Gwebecimele
  • Gwebecimele
  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Ozoneblue
    March 4, 2013 at 13:51 pm

    OB,

    “Are you saying those cops who were shot in the head deserved it maggs?”

    You can’t stay sane for more that 1.5 minutes, can you?

    Only a flipping imbicile will draw such an inane conclusion from what I posted.

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Gwebecimele
    March 4, 2013 at 14:58 pm

    LMAO Gwebs.

    I rarely read stuff in detail which involves Clever Trevor – maybe I should make an exception in this comical instance.

  • spoiler

    I agree – hypocrisy in the main. After Marikana why is anyone surprised at what happened to Mr Macia? The fix isnt going to be easy – how do you undo years of lip service and in many cases total disrgard for the rule of law by the political elite in SA? It goes further – without education and thereafter jobs and income, the crime stats are not going to improve and the DOJ will continue to fail as it bursts at the seams. This is really just another indicator of all that needs fixing in SA.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    My friend Dan Khumalo always used to shriek at me:

    “Illiterates!!!??? You can’t tell them a thing, Madoda!

    They don’t listen. They don’t think. They don’t learn….”

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Brett

    “My friend Dan Khumalo always used to shriek at me …”

    Reminds me of the one time my friends Philemon Makwanazi, Dumusani Xulu and Shadrack Mkhize screamed: “the oxen are slow, but the earth is patient!”

    Thanks.

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Racists!

    Ntsele told the newspaper opposition parties had an agenda against black businessmen and that the website’s cost was fair.

    http://mg.co.za/article/2013-03-04-free-state-government-pay-alleged-r140-million-for-tendered-website

    Anyone who’s got a complaint – may the praises of Bellem rain down on you!

    The collaboration between the different spheres of government, the community media and private sector to realize the implementation of this project is a concrete manifestation that; “Working Together, We Can Do More!”

    http://www.freestateonline.fs.gov.za/?page_id=384

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    It just cost me $19-95 to renew my domain name for another year….

  • Paul Kearney

    Prof you are obviously out of touch with SA down there in Zillestan. Unless of course the “chattering classes” are PC ivory tower academics like you and that destroyer of SA education, Graeeeme Bloch. SAPS have been systematically destroyed from the top down thanks to cadre deployment, again starting from the top. The cadres you quote were, to a man/woman, lazy, incompetent and probably corrupt. Great examples. The next level down that was actually meant to implement plans for competency, training and recruitment were ditto. And so it goes.

    In my opinion, the most competent and honest policemen are at street and station level and there are a good number. But I feel desperately sorry for them as they will never rise in the organisation without backhanders and political connections. The brutality that occurs on a daily basis (it’s visited me too) is just a symptom of the fish rotting from the head.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    What we saw in Daveyton is exactly the kind of enforcer the warlords want.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Before we started hammering them in the media Jackie Selebi’s SAPS routinely used to arrest people who defended themselves like this:

    http://www.beeld.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Vrou-skiet-aanvaller-dood-20130304

    Vrou skiet aanvaller dood
    2013-03-04 22:55
    Marietie Louw-Carstens
    ’n Vrou van Tzaneen het gisteroggend ’n man doodgeskiet wat haar in ’n afgebrande stoor op ’n hoewe met ’n mes aangeval het.

    Die aanvaller het Susan Pohl (52) met die mes in haar linkerarm gesteek voordat sy vier skote op hom geskiet het.

    Sy het gistermiddag gesê: “Dit was ek of hy.”

    Drie van die vier skote het die man getref. Hy is op die toneel dood.

    Sy sê sy het gisteroggend omstreeks 09:00 na ’n afgebrande stoorkamer op die Yamorna-hoewes buite Tzaneen gegaan. Sy doen administratiewe werk vir die eienaars van die hoewe.

    Die stoorkamer is die naweek vermoedelik deur booswigte afgebrand.

    “Die dak het ingeval en ek het binne-in gaan kyk na die skade. Skielik het ’n man agter die verbrande rommel uitgespring.”

    Die man het ’n mes by hom gehad. Pohl het met haar linkerarm probeer keer dat die man haar seermaak. Hy het op haar afgestorm en haar in die arm gesteek.

    Pohl is die afgelope 11 jaar ’n weduwee en woon alleen. “Ek dra altyd ’n vuurwapen by my, want ’n mens kan nooit te versigtig wees nie.”

    Sy het na die pistool in die holster op haar heup gegryp en na die man geskiet. Hy het uit die gebou gestrompel en ’n paar meter verder neergeslaan.

    “Dit het alles in ’n breukdeel van ’n sekonde gebeur. Ek het groot geskrik toe hy op my afstorm. As ek nie geskiet het nie, was ek dood.” Sy sê sy dink die skok sal haar eers later tref. Sy het vyf steke in die arm gekry.

    Die man was alleen en Pohl sê hy het niks gesê nie. Sy het ’n lisensie vir die vuurwapen.

    Brig. Hangwani Mulaudzi, kommunikasiehoof van die polisie in Limpopo, sê die man is nog nie geïdentifiseer nie.

    Mulaudzi sê geen moordklag word tans ondersoek nie. Die polisie sal wel ’n geregtelike ondersoek na die dood doen.

  • Mike

    @PDV – It is ironic that this incident is about two elements of society,that is taxi drivers and police,who have become a law unto themselves,and indeed the whole incident was sparked off by the taxi driver refusing to move his taxi when requested, behaviour that is quite common by these taxi drivers and then of course the beating that resulted in his death which is just unacceptable.
    Extrajudical killings were not just confirned to the SAP’s of the apartheid era, they were a hall mark of the violence in KZN in the eighties and it should be remebered that many of the senior ranking police, ANC cadres promoted through affirmative action which you support, are directly responsible for this type of action by the SAP.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Yes, and both have huge bodycounts. The ANC reponse was to subject this country’s gun owners -who commit neglible crime – to the Skills Act and the NQF, prescribe competency testing and generate Unit Standards to be assessed on.

    What competency testing is there for the SAPS or taxi drivers?

    Mike says:
    March 5, 2013 at 8:33 am
    “@PDV – It is ironic that this incident is about two elements of society,that is taxi drivers and police,who have become a law unto themselves”

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    As an aside – there seems to be a huge number of Mozambicans popping out the woordwork now.

    Like rhino poaching in the Kruger another consequence of ANC ineptitude.

  • Mike

    @BRETT – I heard a statistic quoted on the radio from the Gun Owners Association that over the last ten years 8000 fire arms have either being lost or stolen from SAP’s.
    One thing is for sure this type of statistic did not occur with SAP’s under apartheid and neither did it occur in the SADF because the punishment was severe.

  • Mike

    @BRETT – Mathias Mathe the infamous mozambican had a platoon of men that in one month poisened 300 dogs here in the east rand to clear the way for house breaking.I use the word platoon because it has surfaced that both ex Zimbawean and Mozambican “freedom fighters ” have been involved in violent criminal activities in the east rand particularly people living on small holdings and plots similar to what is happening at Muldersdrift.

  • Gwebecimele
  • Colin

    To: Paul Kearney –

    I note your wild allegations re “cadre deployment” with concern. Two highly decorated MK cadre’s now in the Police Service in the Western Cape immediately come to mind – General Jeremy Vearey and Brigadier Andre Lincoln. Vearey was on the verge of exposing huge corruption in the now defunct Gang Unit when DA MP, Lennit Max (then WCape Police Commissioner) oversaw the laying of spurious charges and testified against him. Those imbeciles in the Police Gang Unit (remnants of the apartheid regime) who represent the “rotten fish” you refer to were allowed to get away with their corruptive deeds and are currently living off their pensions courtesy of the taxes that I pay each month. How ironic that the DA now wants this same Gang Unit reinstated (the mind boggles). By the way, Vearey’s direct intervention also led to the arrest of renowned Helderberg Rapist, Johannes Mouwers; but, I digress. Turning to Brig. Andre Lincoln, he was also on the verge of exposing corrupt senior police officers and their links to the Italian Mafia when that other apartheid remnant, “General” Leonard Knipe raided his offices and removed all his files (including my corruption docket on Mark Thatcher but; I digress). This is the same Brig Lincoln who prevented a Police Colonel from assassinating Pres. Nelson Mandela on 27 April 1994. Lincoln also exposed a massive counterfeiting operation that was operating from inside the police headquarters in Pretoria. That’s right – the “old guard” were churning out excellent dollar bills that drew the attention of the US Secret Service. Knipe and his cohorts laid 47 spurious charges against Lincoln virtually destroying his career. After 12 long years, Lincoln was eventually vindicated when 2 High Court Judges overturned every single corrupt conviction against him, stating that this matter should never have proceeded to Court. He was reinstated but is now fighting a new battle for his back pay (with interest) and promotion to General that is rightfully due to him. Vearey and Lincoln are sons of the soil and deserve their posts having fought the rascist apartheid regime so that you and I can partake in the democracy we all enjoy today. When raising an issue on a public platform, ensure that you have all the facts at your disposal before you generalise against innocent members of the Police Service. Yes, there are some rotten apples but they are completely outnumbered by those who choose to protect and serve.

  • Gwebecimele

    Farmer Brown,”They eat so good at your expense”
    Bloody handbook.

    http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Gauteng-leaders-abusing-credit-cards-20130305

  • Gwebecimele
  • Mike

    @Colin – One swallow does not a summer make

  • Jeremy Vearey

    While I am loathe to respond to prejudicial generalizations such as those made by Paul Kearney, I feel compelled to question the factual basis on which Kearney’s assumptions rest as both a senior officer in the SAPS and an ex-Robben Islander. As a living example of what you caricature, please explain what you know about me in terms of my professional history as a detective and intelligence officer in the SAPS and my levels of training as a specialist in both fields both inside and outside this country before 1994 which would support your assertions. While you are at it, also explain my history as member of Umkhonto We Sizwe since 1983 and ex-member of the ANC’s Department of Intelligence and Security. Please extrapolate your findings from these facts I have provided you tentatively and engage me in argument about any generalised conclusion you might want to draw therefrom about others who have the same history who now serve competently within the SAPS and security services of the state. Lets test you assumptions objectively with the benefit of hearing the voices of the actual people whom you don’t know but prejudicially label negatively and conjure conclusions about out of thin air.

    However, I do believe this debate would be better and more constructively served by informed deliberations premised on tested or, for want of a more rational word, empirical data.

  • Jeremy Vearey

    Mike. Do you have enough of a representative sample of swallows to support you innuendo with the requisite standard of generalization required?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Cool! You have the audience you want now tell us what you want us to hear.

    The results are there for all to see of ‘reintegration’ in the SAPS – 500 000 murders with a conviction rate of 13%, a rape conviction rate of 2,8%, trio crimes less than 1%, one comrade deployed cadre commissioner in limbo and his predecessor comrade deployed cadre commissioner deadly ill now not to be seen having finessed his prison sentence….Miracle cure? What happened to the daily dialysis?

    Perhaps you can give us the insiders’ view on why specifically Gary Kruser was appointed to oversee the campaign of intimidation to bully aged white South Africans to hand in their registered firearms under threat of 15 year sentences then Arno Lamoer?

  • Lisbeth

    Jeremy Vearey

    No representative sample required. You see one swallow, it’s definitely summer.

  • Chris

    LOL, do we have a police general who is disputing that the police is a totally disfunctional organization!
    Well, I’m a practicing lawyer who deals with the police on a daily basis, and he will find it extremely difficult to convince me.

  • Gwebecimele

    In my view, the bad members of SAPS are not different from bad health, education, municipal officials etc. We have enough stories of patients who die at the hands of our health officials, children falling into neglected manholes and education that fails our kids.

    The shocking and common factor amongst these failures is that the victims are blacks failed by black officials. Blacks are on the receiving end of this incompetence but that does not mean it should be spreading to other groups. Instead this should be completely eliminated by restoring the pride of the black so that they can start treating each other differently.

    I am of the opinion that blacks are seen as easy targets.

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    Could we all just take a moment from our understandably domestic concerns to show a little SOLIDARITY with the people of the Democratic Republic of Korea, who supported our struggle, and who are currently facing an unprecedented assault from US IMPERIALISTS and their running-dog lackeys in Seoul?

    Thanks.

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder
    March 6, 2013 at 1:07 am

    Dworky …

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    hehehe

    Communications Minister Dina Pule on Tuesday asked Parliament to “urgently” review the fitness of the SABC board.

    “The South African public deserves a public broadcaster that informs, educates and entertains them,” Pule said in a statement.

    “I have asked Parliament, as the institution that interviews the board members, to advise if they believe this board is helping the government to deliver on its mandate to give South Africans access to quality public broadcasting, which is their human right.”

    http://www.timeslive.co.za/politics/2013/03/05/pule-questions-fitness-of-sabc-board

  • Colin

    How ironic that those who debate with me mention nothing about the City of Cape Town “law enforcement” imbecile who assaulted me on Human Rights Day in the presence of an MP and a High Court Advocate. I alerted Madam Zille about this (she of Botox fame) but, as usual, she did sweet zilch about it. Completely useless……….

  • Mike

    @Jeremy Veary -Try canvassing whats happening down the South Coast in KZN particularly in Amazimtoti where on a daily basis people are being attacked in there homes by persons just walking around the streets looking for criminal opportunities.
    The previous station commander some three years ago had the area very much under control but then they had an affirmative action appointment and policing in Amazimtoti has just collapsed.
    My aging father from over the wall had interrupted a young black man attempting to kick down his neigbours back door, the police stated that if my father could not indentify the perpetrator then they would not take down a statement.
    Great for crime statistics and once again.
    As the police are supposed to be apolitical what exactly does your stint on Robben Island prove except to prove the opposite and that is there is no room for the career policeman ireespective of his or her political persuasion.
    Are you proud of the fact that Renate Barnard has had to fight for ten years to get the promotion she deserves.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    We didn’t know about it. I hope you laid a charge of assault.

    Colin says:
    March 6, 2013 at 7:32 am

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Maggs, why hasn’t Dina Pule been fired yet?

    Why hasn’t the SABC been liquidated yet?

    Does it exist to provide employment for Mrs Nzimande?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Yes, I agree: It is a generalised malaise. The spirit of Haikona Matatazela.

    One often sees black bureaucrats who will treat white people courteously, then speak to black customers like they were dirt.

    Gwebecimele says:
    March 5, 2013 at 23:12 pm

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 6, 2013 at 8:09 am

    Brett

    “Maggs, why hasn’t Dina Pule been fired yet?”

    Cos we’ve refined the art of the DUTY-FREE Cabinet

  • Chris

    Colin says:
    March 6, 2013 at 7:32 am

    How ironic, Helen Zille is now a police official? How about reporting to General Vearey?

  • Colin

    Chris, I reported the incident to Zille as she was Mayor at the time and de facto “boss” responsible for that imbecile, the “law enforcement” moron who assaulted me. Then you wonder why Zille has excluded her Metro cops from the Khayelitsha enquiry???? On the subject of the Botox Madam, when she was still Mayor of Cape Town, she promised to accommodate the backyard dwellers of Zilleraine Heights (named after her) in a pilot project in Grassy Park. It is common cause that Zille’s administration has since evicted these homeless people after they lost their case in the Appeal Court. They are effectively waiting to be dumped in Happy Valley or Blikkiesdorp, though both these TRA’s (“temporary relocation areas”) are bursting at the seams. Lorraine Heunis (the other part of “Zille-raine”) will testify under oath that Zille telephoned her and promise her a house (only for Heunis) in a new housing development. Zille of course denied this when MPL, Maz Ozinsky confronted her in the legislature and, for some inexplicable reason, I was not required to testify on behalf of the homeless people when Zille took them to the High Court (Zille knew of my involvement with these very poor folk and I have e-mail correspondence from her on the subject but, I digress). On another occasion, a DA Councillor publicly swore at me using the most profane and obscene language imaginable while on official business with Zille in that leafy suburb called Fairways. When I reported him to Zille, she sent me an e-mail saying she would “speak to the Councillor”. I never heard from her again and the Councillor was allowed to serve out his full term of office and is now drawing his pension from my monthly taxes. At that same incident, it was very painful to see some old SACOS buddies from Fairways now on Zille’s side swaying in the wind as if there was no tomorrow – “Mayor this” and “Mayor that”. How times have changed, but…….. I digress. Following another protest action by backyard dwellers at Khoisan Heights in Fairways, the media reported Mayor Zille as saying: “We are all Capetonians and I share your pain. This matter is close to my heart and I will not turn my back on you” (source: IOL). Zille then publicly promised to relocate 18 families to Pelican Park but she changed her tune an hour later when her plan fell through. I was in the vehicle of the late activist, Bra Des Ross when Zille called him on his cellphone and asked him to tell the backyard dwellers that she could not move them. Bra Des flatly refused and told Zille, in my presence, that she should do it herself as she had reneged on her public promise as Mayor. Then last year, when I reported a Council official to Zille for trying to ban me from a public meeting on Council property in Cape Town, she denied that I had informed her despite me having sent the same e-mail to her 3 different office addresses as well as her private email address. With respect, your Zille appears to be quite good at dishing out dirt against her adversaries and these have been well documented both in the print media and online. However, the mark of a good politician is determined by the way she responds to criticism around her own public image. Zille has miserably failed the litmus test and the Gupta affair, amongst others, is proof of this. I have pleaded with her (if she is unhappy) to issue Summons against me as I confront her with these facts but, I am still waiting. As they say … “I rest my case m’Lud”.

  • Mike

    @Colin – it would appear that your litmus test for Zille is very different to the one you hold JZ accountable for, if at all.

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Colin

    Colin is right. Zille is turning the WC into a private Volkstaat where she will reinstate both apartheid and a form of “Botox” capitalism. Why do you think she has appointed an all-WHITIST cabinet? What about all the near-Marikane moments near Ceres? Most important, what about the fact that hundreds of thousands of REFUGEES are fleeing back to the Eastern Cape every day?

    Thanks

  • Colin

    Mike, I would appreciate it if you could debate with me on the specific issues that I am raising. When I joined this debate, I chose to deal with the obviously failures of the DA and Zille specifically.

    If I look at your contribution that follows the issues I raised, it reminds me of the “smoke and mirrors” that the learned Judge, Her Ladyship Jeanette Traverso refers to when she exonerated Genl. Lincoln after remnants of the apartheid regime, including that imbecile, Leonard Knipe, laid 47 false charges against him. Mike, have you considered what the poor and indigent people of the Cape Flats could’ve done with all the State’s legal fees that were wasted in bringing this matter to trial? Why are you so quiet on this rape of the judicial process? In case you missed the facts that I am aware of, Knipe also allegedly removed various weapons from the scene of a gruesome accident that killed 2 other apartheid remnants, Des Segal and Snakes Huysamer. The arsenal of weapons, enough to start a small war included a RPG7 rocket launcher and an R4 automatic machine gun. Why on earth so many weapons Mike? Where were these weapons destined for? This of course is the same Leonard Knipe who was linked to the apartheid murders of the Gugulethu Seven. The front page picture of that other apartheid remnant, John Sterrenburg standing with his boot on the dead body of a comrade as if he had just shot a Rhino is still vivid in my memory, Mike.

    Why do you mention nothing about former Prov. Police Commissioner, and now DA MP, Lennit Max? What are you scared of Mike? This is the same Max who was instructed by two Police Generals in about 2007 to take a statement from me regarding my corruption dossier on Mark Thatcher. Max never did. Why Mike? (Errrr, that’s the same file that disappeared when Knipe illegally raided Lincoln’s office, Mike). Furthermore, this is the same Max who was also instructed to take another statement from me about a certain high-flyer who was involved in drug deals. Max never did, Mike. That same high-flyer has now gone on to acquire unexplained wealth which includes several properties as well as expensive luxury German sedans.

    Mike……I’m on a roll.

    Why do DA supporters blame the ANC for Anene Booysen’s murder? Let me explain the basic facts to you Mike. The DA controls the municipality responsible for Bredasdorp. The buck stops with the DA if anything goes wrong cos that municipality receives my taxes from the fiscus to take care of service delivery in that part of the enclave. This is not rocket science Mike, please my brother.

    When the DA’s Patricia de Lille “transfers” some R80m from the current budget of the City of Cape Town to next year’s financial budget, it means that the poor will continue to suffer and those that do crime will continue to do so cos of their poor social circumstances that could’ve been improved with just R1 000 of that R80m.

    Mike, why does the DA ask the citizens of Cape Town for donations for victims of the dozens of fires here in the City; yet it intends spending R23m on upgrading that piece of colonial junk called the City Hall?

    Mike, in case you missed it, I’m speaking to you on the obvious failures of the DA – is it too much to ask you and your cohorts to debate with me rationally?

    P.S. Apologies Mike, I almost forgot. Why are so many ex-Police/Army apartheid Generals meeting in secrecy here in the Western Cape? What on earth could they be discussing in this enclave?……………….

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Colin, surely you are aware policing is a National Government function?

    The Province merely has oversight powers, and from what you are saying the Oversight law the DANC is trying to enact in the face of inexplicable stubborn resistance from the ANC comes none too soon?

    Seems to me you should touch bases with that other corruption buster here in Gauteng – Paul Sullivan.

  • Maggs Naidu – Towards a DUTY-FREE Cabinet! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 7, 2013 at 8:05 am

    Brett

    “Colin, surely you are aware policing is a National Government function?”

    Stop being a doos – there’s no such thing as “National Government function”.

    We have a DUTY-FREE government – a uniquely South African innovation!

  • Pingback: Enforcers | Rebuilding Foundations

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Colin

    “Why are so many ex-Police/Army apartheid Generals meeting in secrecy here in the Western Cape? What on earth could they be discussing in this enclave?”

    With respect, Mike, you question borders on naiveté. Everyone knows that the meetings are part of Madam Zille’s plain to establish a VOLKSTAAT, close the borders to Eastern Cape refugees, institute a regime of “botox” capitalism financed by Iranian oil — an offer political asylum to Oscar Pistorious!

  • Colin

    Brett, what you are raising is more “smoke and mirrors”. You cannot blame the ANC Government for the incompetent apartheid agents carrying out their own agenda’s on the ground. I don’t really want to engage with you on a “no-brainer” and can only speculate as to why nobody is responding to my specific arguments on the DA and Zille. You are raising a moot point which is not taking this debate any further. I have raised my points ad nauseam and note that nobody is prepared to engage with me on the facts presented. What were the agenda’s of Basie Smit, Knipe, Segal, Huysamer, Wessels, Max et al and who were the Master’s that they were serving? More importantly, are these Masters still being served? Yes it is, if you know what I know about what is happening on the Cape Flats. Are you really serious about blaming the ANC for their deeds? At least after 18 years, the ANC is trying their best to unravel the stench from centuries of colonial apartheid rule. Stop shifting the goal posts and respond to the prima facie facts that I have raised against your DA. Brett, if you see Leonard Knipe (who is not a member of the ANC), please instruct him to return my corruption file on Mark Thatcher………

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Colin, the ANC has been in government 19 years.

    The collapse in the SAPS is mirrored by collapse in every sphere of governance. Wherever the ANC has thrown its weight about in its inimitable big-assed way there is chaos. If you look at the MRC link I posted above you will see that the NPA has to deal with half the murders of women they had to deal with in 1999 and they are trying those cases even more poorly.

    That is all that needs to be said on the subject.

  • http://www.ozoneblue.co.za/ Ozoneblue

    Colin
    March 7, 2013 at 13:33 pm

    “Brett, what you are raising is more “smoke and mirrors”. You cannot blame the ANC Government for the incompetent apartheid agents carrying out their own agenda’s on the ground.”

    Hi Colin. Can we blame the ANC government for appointing a thief, self-confessed “Friend of the Mafia” as National Commissioner of Police? If not, who must we blame for it?

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Ozone and Colin

    President Zuma has pointed out that our society is not violent — and that, to the extent it is, that is the legacy of APARTHEID. Yet I see this as a distraction from the mounting crisis in the Korean peninsula. And so I ask the question: why are our diplomats at the UN not protecting our allies in the Democratic Republic from U.S.-led sanctions?

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    Colin, Irwin Jim is saying that National Development Plan is a carbon-copy of “right wing” DA policy. But I can’t believe that. The ANC would not have unanimously adopted the DA’s macro-economic plan. Please help me understand what is going on.

    Thanks.

  • Colin

    Brett, you refer to a “collapse in every sphere of governance”. The same goes for the DA in the Western Cape. An acquaintance of mine was almost left paralysed after being given an incorrect injection. This happened in a hospital under the DA’s control and administration. It hasn’t escaped my attention that your Prem. Zille has appointed a farmer as her Health MEC but, I digress.

    Ozoneblue, when I came across a photo of a certain ANC ex-Police Commissioner still hanging on the wall of a Cape Flats police station, I gave FIRM instructions that it be removed – it was. By the way, the Cape Flats is that desolate place that people of colour were abandoned to at the height of the forced removals campaign by the apartheid regime.

    Why is nobody engaging with me on my facts presented re DA corruption?

    What are you scared of? ………..

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Colin, according to Schedule 4 to the Constitution national and provincial governments have concurrent legislative competence over health. One does not hear of suppliers not being paid by the Western Cape Department of Health, you do not hear of babies dying in its hospitals unattended.

    You’re in denial, dude.

  • Maggs Naidu – GOSA is FUBAR! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 8, 2013 at 9:27 am

    Hey G,

    “One does not hear of suppliers not being paid by the Western Cape Department of Health, you do not hear of babies dying in its hospitals unattended.”

    That will have to be checked but I suspect that you’re fibbing.

    Anyway – in the WC you hear of open toilets, Councillors shooting at kids, refugees, professional blacks …

  • Maggs Naidu – GOSA is FUBAR! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    p.s. Dworky will explain!

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    @ Colin

    “Why is nobody engaging with me on my facts presented re DA corruption?”

    Colin, I have long been alerting the good people on this blog to massive DA corruption. For some reason, most of them follow the WHITIST liberal media in focussing obsessively on Nkandla etc., but avert their eyes from trillions wasted by the DA on busses and bicycles lanes. And what about the small fleet of German luxury cars specially imported for Madam Botox’s “blue light” convoy? Hey?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    You forgot the huge influx of refugees from ANC-governed territories, Maggs!

  • Colin

    Mikhail – Thx Bru – I’m running out of time as I expose the corrupt DA.

    Brett, re “you do not hear of babies dying in its hospitals unattended” – the following was sourced from a local Cape paper:

    “AN INQUEST docket into why the bodies of two full-term babies, wearing Retreat Maternity Unit identification bracelets, were found among anatomical medical waste has been opened. And the fact that the boy and a girl had apparently been carried to full-term is being investigated by both the police and the Western Cape Provincial Department of Health. On Wednesday 21 July 2010, Bishop Lavis police were alerted to the shocking discovery at a waste management company, BCL Medical Waste Management, at Airport Industria”. (source: Peoples Post).

    Its now 2013 Brett (3 years later) and I’m still waiting on a progress report from the Desperate Alternative’s Western Cape Provincial Department of Health.

    In the words of Bob Marley “You can fool some people sometimes but you can’t fool all the people all the time”……….

  • Colin

    Brett, I’m on a roll – chew on this when you have a gap (sent to Herr Carlisle this a.m.)

    Subject: DA “Brown envelope scandal”

    Without Prejudice

    The Honourable Carlisle
    Enclave of the Western Cape

    Sir,

    I was extremely shocked and livid to read an article titled “corruption not proved in brown envelope scandal” hidden away on page 5 of yesterday’s Cape Times (pdf encl.).

    As there was much talk recently about spaghetti monsters dancing around Botox cheese, I read the article again in an attempt to make sense of it and apply my mind.

    It is common cause that on 22 Feb. 2011, you replied in a debate to the Premier’s State of the Province Address in the local legislature as follows – and I quote:

    “Mr Speaker, it is instructive to consider what the administration of the former Premier Lynne Brown and her Cabinet said and did about the corruption they found when they took office from Rasool and his cronies.

    When this (DA) administration took over it carried out three further major investigations, and instigated or completed over 30 forensic investigations.

    There could be no doubt that massive corruption had occurred, committed by persons as yet unknown. The files were handed to the Hawks, many months ago, but progress appears to be distressingly slow.

    In addition, Fransman has been implicated by one of the beneficiaries in the alleged payments to journalists.

    I know there were such payments because a partner in the events company then retained by the ANC administration told me that he was requested to facilitate the bribes, which he refused to do. It is now long overdue that he makes this information public.

    Currently, everyman and his dog is investigating the things that happened in Transport and Public Works.

    And they involve everything from favours-for-pals to plundering the public purse for the benefit of the usual suspects, to Fransman’s alleged role in the ‘brown envelope’ scandal that saw two journalists allegedly paid to write favourable stories about the previous administration.

    “I will be vindicated”, Mr Fransman argues. “It’s all a plot”, he claims. “You will see”, he says.

    Well, Mr Fransman, we await.

    Why do you not act to clear your name?

    What are you waiting for?

    Where is the evidence to which you refer?

    How long do you need?” – Unquote.

    Mr Carlisle, at this juncture, what you stated so publicly in the legislature last year and what I read yesterday is, to say the least, very confusing.

    As any learned Judge would say when confronted with confusion: “There are consequently two mutually destructive versions before us”.

    On the issue of Judges, I refer to a passing comment of Her Ladyship, Judge Jeanette Traverso in the appeal of General Andre Lincoln against the 47 false charges that were laid against him by your remnants of the apartheid regime – she referred to the charges as “smoke and mirrors” and further stated that the case against Lincoln should never have proceeded to Court as the evidence was not only weak but also false.

    Honourable Carlisle, just so that we are on the same page, Andre Lincoln is the same highly decorated MK operative who prevented a white Police Colonel from assassinating President Nelson Mandela on 27 April 1994.

    Now, having read your speech of 22 Feb. 2011, could your diatribe not also be a case of “smoke and mirrors”.

    You refer to the DA’s “three major investigations and over 30 forensic investigations”.

    Really? So:

    1) how many criminal charges have you laid? and

    2) how many convictions in a Court of Law have there been?

    Mr Carlisle, do yourself a favour.

    Have a quiet word with your colleague Advocate Lennit Max, MP and ask him to elucidate on the following:

    “ei incumbat probatio qui affrimat, non qui negat” – the burden of proving an allegation is on the party making it.

    I rest my case.

    “Justice will overtake fabricators of lies and false witnesses” – Heraclitus

  • Mikhail Dworkin Fassbinder

    Maggs, I pray that it will one day be revealed why the LIBERAL media ignores the culture of DA-inspired corruption that has swept in like a tsunami from the icy Atlantic. This morning I had to subsidise a “car guard” just to park my car in Long Street!

    Thanks.

  • Chris

    LOL, when a man starts thanking MDF you know that he is really, really lost!

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    I am well and truly rebutted, Colin. That is a damn disgrace. Especially if the poor little guys haven’t got any kind of justice yet.

    Colin says:
    March 8, 2013 at 13:46 pm

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    At least the dogs in the SAPS still do their duty….

    http://www.beeld.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Nicky-jou-doring-20130307

  • Colin

    Brett et al,

    Some food for thought:

    When a DA supporter physically tried to prevent me from attending a Police CPF meeting on State property, can you blame the ANC for this?

    When a “white” cop instructed me not to test an obviously drunk white driver for being “motherless” (under the influence) during my tenure as a Police Reservist, can you blame the ANC for this?

    When a white Police Captain forged my signature in the firearms register after I had omitted to sign in my Z88 when returning from duty, can you blame the ANC for this?

    When a white prosecutor suggested to me inside Court that I drop charges of assault I had laid and take a warning from Police Management instead because the accused was an informer, can you blame the ANC for this?

    After I had exposed blatant corruption between Mark Thatcher and numerous white senior Commissioned Police Officers, a white Police Captain posted a photo of me on the police notice board with the caption “wanted – dead or alive”, can you blame the ANC for this?

    When “coloured” police reservists are instructed to clean up the vomit of a white Police Captain who went out partying in a Police vehicle instead of doing his “Officer” duties, can you blame the ANC for this?

    You need to accept that all is not well in the racist enclave and you and your cohort’s failure to engage me on the facts is proof of this.

    Hamba kahle!

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
  • Colin

    Respond to my take on the DA – no more mindless “smoke and mirrors”.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Maggs, remind me quickly? How many deaths in detention were there for the duration of Apartheid?

    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71654?oid=363458&sn=Detail&pid=71616

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    http://www.beeld.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Macia-self-vas-oor-manslag-20130311

    ‘Macia self vas oor manslag’

    2013-03-11 23:15
    Wolfram Zwecker

    Die Mosambiekse taxibestuurder van Daveyton wat twee weke gelede in polisie-aanhouding dood is, was self enkele dae vantevore in ’n ongeluk betrokke waarin vyf kinders dood is.

    Volgens Lokhimbar Dikatope, regsverteenwoordiger van ses van die nege beskuldigdes wat van moord op Mido Macia aangekla word, is die oorledene van strafbare manslag aangekla weens die ongeluk in Mpumalanga.

    Luidens die lykskouingsverslag wat gister tydens die nege se borgtogaansoek in die Benoni-streekhof ingedien is, is Macia weens ’n gebrek aan suurstof dood.

    Hy het beserings aan sy kop, nek, arms, gewrigte en aan bykans al sy organe gehad. Sy geslagsdele was gekneus en hy het nie meer sy broek aangehad nie.

    Hy het bloeding in sy linkerlong en in die weefsel om sy hart gehad.

    Die beskuldigdes is Michak Malele (46), Thamsanqa Ncema (35), Percy Mnisi (26), Bongumusa Mdluli (25), Sipho Ngobeni (30), Lungisa Ewababa (31), Bongani Kolisi (27), Linda Sololo (56) en Motome Walter Ramatlou (37).

    Die nege word daarvan aangekla dat hulle Macia ná ’n stryery aan ’n polisievoertuig vasgeboei het. Hulle het hom daarna glo sowat 500 m deur die strate na die Daveyton-polisiekantoor gesleep.

    Daar is hy in ’n sel gelos waar hy later die aand dood in ’n plas bloed aangetref is. Niemand het ’n dokter of ambulans ontbied nie.

    Dikatope het aangevoer Malele het ’n klag van aanranding teen Macia aanhangig gemaak omdat Macia blykbaar Malele se vuurwapen wou steel.

    Landdros Samuel Makuma het die borgtogaansoek tot vanoggend uitgestel.

    Ná die hofverrigtinge gister het die polisie en lede van die Ekurhuleni-metropolisie die regsverteenwoordigers van die nege polisiemanne buite die hof teen ontstoke inwoners van Daveyton beskerm.

    Die inwoners het hulle uitgeskel omdat hulle probeer om vir die polisiemanne borgtog te kry. Hulle moet in die selle boet vir wat hulle gedoen het, het betogers geskreeu.

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    http://www.beeld.com/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Moordkomplot-Amptenaar-gepos-20130311

    Moordkomplot: Amptenaar gepos
    2013-03-11 23:18

    Susan Cilliers

    ’n Noordwes-regeringsamptenaar wat glo besig is met ’n moordkomplot teen ’n wetgewerlid wat korrupsie beveg, is gister gepos.

    Lesiba Kgwele, woordvoerder van die premierskantoor, het gesê Dan Selebano se afdanking was onvermydelik in die lig van die ernstige bewerings teen hom.

    “Thandi Modise, premier, verwelkom ook die feit dat die Valke dié bewerings nou ondersoek.”

    Kapt. Paul Ramaloko, woordvoerder van die Valke, het gister gesê die Valke het nog nie formeel ’n saak geopen nie, maar hulle “kyk na” die situasie nadat Patrick Chauke, voorsitter van die Noordwes-wetgewer se staande komitee oor openbare rekeninge (Skoor), hulle genader het oor die beweerde moordplanne teen hom.

    Sowetan het gister berig die koerant het ’n bandopname gekry waarin Selebano, ’n mediaskakelbeampte by Noordwes se departement van maatskaplike ontwikkeling, glo sê Chauke moet “gestop” word. Selebano sê in dié bandopname na bewering ook aan ’n vrou hy is bereid om te betaal vir die “missie”.

    Hy het nie gister op Beeld se versoek om kommentaar gereageer nie. Teenoor Sowetan het hy die bewerings teen hom ontken. “Ek het net bedoel Chauke moet tot orde geroep word en ek wou betaal word vir petrolkoste.”

    Die beweerde dreigemente teen Chauke hou vermoedelik verband met onder meer sy onlangse aanbeveling dat Mosetsanagape Mokomele-Mothibi, LUR vir maatskaplike ontwikkeling, R174 000 moet terugbetaal wat sy onregmatig aan verblyf vir haarself, personeellede en vriende by die ANC se Mangaung-konferensie bestee het.

    Chris Hattingh, DA-leier in Noordwes, het gesê Skoor ondersoek onder Chauke se leierskap ook verskeie ander bewerings van onreëlmatighede by die departement van maatskaplike ontwikkeling.

    Chauke se reaksie gister op die beweerde doodsdreigemente was dat niks hom sal keer om korrupsie te beveg en toe te sien dat openbare geld vir dienslewering aangewend word nie. “Ek laat die saak nou in die polisie se hande.”

    Kenny Morolong, ANC-woordvoerder in Noordwes, het gesê die party sal die bewerings ondersoek en “op ’n gepaste tyd ’n openbare aankondiging daaroor maak.”

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Another tale of utterly pointless, mindless ANC violence:

    http://www.iol.co.za/news/crime-courts/bodies-linked-to-winnie-exhumed-1.1485213

  • Colin

    Brett et al, do yourselves a favour. Check out this link on DA corruption:

    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71619?oid=357523&sn=Marketingweb+detail

    P.S. Dont forget to open the PDF file that contains the forensic report.

    Hamba kahle!

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    http://www.rapport.co.za/Suid-Afrika/Nuus/Polisie-vs-die-publiek-20130316

    The disHonourable Mthethwa is such a loser!

    To think I supported him over Enegiserbunny Fikile Mbalula.

    Someone, kick my ass!

  • Maggs Naidu – (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Hey Brett – is it legally permissible to fire “warning shots”?

    The officer took out his firearm and shot a warning shot in the air

    http://www.citypress.co.za/news/cop-stabbed-taxi-driver-shot-in-klerksdorp/

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    I think it is always highly desirable to fire warning shots if they’re going to end up in the azz of one Maggs J Naidu. Otherwise, it is a pretty dumb idea where there are people about.

    Another Apartheid-SAP remnant, no doubt. Being that he is 36.

    The accused in the Daveyton travesty are: Thamsanqa Ncema (35), Meshack Malele (45), Motome Walter Ramatlou (37), Percy Mnisi (26), Bongumusa Mdluli (25), Sipho Ngobeni (30), Lungisa Ewababa (31), Bongani Kolisi (27) and Linda Sololo (56).

    That would make Ncema 16 years old when Apartheid ended, Ramatlou 18 Mnisi 7 Mdluli 5 Sipho Ngobeni 11 Ewababa 12 and Bongani Kolisi 8.

    The old SAP obviously kept these child-prodigies secret from us.

    Truly, Comrade Nathi Mthethwa was a rare find for the ANC! Like Cde Zuma, who blames Apartheid for African people lacking skills.

  • Maggs Naidu – GOOFY is FUBAR! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 17, 2013 at 10:11 am

    Hey Goofy,

    LOL – you firing warning shots at me on a Sunday morning, eh!

    Go to church and repent.

    Desirable and dumb idea aside – is it legally permissible?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Look, Maggot. I’m going to have to bill you for this. If you want more information about grounds of justification excluding wrongfulness like private defence and necessity ask Chris and he’ll bill you as well….

    S120 of the Firearms Control Act 60 of 2000. According to Schedule 4 the penalty for contravention is 5 years.

    120(3) It is an offence to-

    (a) cause bodily injury to any person or cause damage to property of any person by negligently using a firearm, an antique firearm or an airgun;

    (b) discharge or otherwise handle a firearm, an antique firearm or an airgun in a manner likely to injure or endanger the safety or property of any person or with reckless disregard for the safety or property of any person; or

    (c) have control of a loaded firearm, an antique firearm or an airgun in circumstances where it creates a risk to the safety or property of any person and not to take reasonable precautions to avoid the danger.

    And

    120(7) It is an offence to discharge a firearm, an antique firearm or an airgun in a built up area or any public place, without good reason to do so.

  • Maggs Naidu – GOOFY is FUBAR! (maggsnaidu@hotmail.com)

    Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?
    March 17, 2013 at 11:22 am

    Earn your fees!

    Where does it unambiguously imply that it’s not legally acceptable to fire a warning shot?

  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Er…..Nowhere?

  • Colin
  • Brett Nortje – 19 years of ANC rule! Is South Africa FUBAR?

    Look, Colin – I am not crazy about the DA for reasons I often state here (not least for being a bunch of gungrabbingfencesittingwhores) but this woman is so far ahead of anything you have to offer….

    http://www.politicsweb.co.za/politicsweb/view/politicsweb/en/page71619?oid=364577&sn=Detail&pid=71616

    The real story behind the WCape farm violence – Helen Zille
    Helen Zille
    17 March 2013

    DA leader says protests were triggered by a BEE consortium cutting workers’ wages on a farm they’d just purchased

    SA Today: The Real Story behind the Western Cape’s Farm Violence

    From years of experience, I know that when I am in a political pressure cooker, it is best to allow the heat to subside and some steam to escape before analysing what happened.

    At the height of a crisis, when perceptions are sharply polarised, people aren’t prepared to question their pre-conceptions. They only see the “evidence” that supports their prejudices.

    The recent “farm strikes” that shook the Western Cape for most of December and January (with a short Christmas break) was a case in point.

    Let’s look at what really happened, not because the crisis is behind us, but because we are in a lull between storms. By all accounts, Mr Noseyman (Nosey) Pieterse, who emerged as a key figure behind the “strikes”, is mobilising for the next round of the “rural struggle” he claims to lead. Mr Pieterse wears several hats. He is simultaneously a farmer, the President of an association of BEE farmers in the wine and spirit industry, as well as a trade union leader, organising workers in the industry.

    We should, in the weeks ahead, be prepared for the possibility of further rural “strikes”. In this context, it would help to have a better understanding of the crisis from which we have just emerged.

    Before I begin, let me be clear: the life of a seasonal farm labourer is a very difficult one. Thousands of poverty stricken people come to the Western Cape from across Southern Africa (particularly Zimbabwe, Lesotho and the Eastern Cape) for the fruit-picking season, desperately seeking work in one of the few remaining sectors that employ unskilled labour. Many of these migrants have remained in the Province permanently and have set up “home” in shack settlements on the outskirts of rural towns.

    Unemployed for most of the year, they rely on the short fruit-picking season to earn some income, much of which disappears immediately into the coffers of loan sharks on whom they depend to keep their families alive. And as growing numbers of desperate work-seekers arrive, the competition intensifies between them for the shrinking number of jobs available, a result of the consolidation of farms and escalating mechanisation. As tough as it is to survive on the daily minimum wage, it is far tougher to earn nothing at all.

    And, as happens world-wide in situations of conflict over scarce resources, individuals band together in groups to protect and advance their interests. In divided societies, the fault line between groups is often determined by ethnicity. Here there are four distinct groups of seasonal work-seekers on the Province’s deciduous fruit and grape farms: Zimbabweans, Basotho, amaXhosa and traditional Western Cape farm workers, who would (in terms of the old apartheid designations) have been classified Coloured.

    This is fertile ground for exploitation. And so it is easy to see how the dominant (but entirely misleading) narrative arose: “heartless white farmers and labour brokers make ‘super profits’ by using ‘divide-and-rule’ tactics to drive down workers’ wages as their lives deteriorate”.

    It is easy to see how this narrative fuelled the anger and rage that led to the destruction of tens of millions of Rands worth of farm infrastructure (packing sheds, cooling stores, tractors, orchards and vineyards) in an orgy of violence lasting several weeks.

    And one can discern the ANC’s interest in fuelling this narrative. It was a golden opportunity to drive a wedge between two strong sectors of DA support — farmers and farm workers – while seeking to position the DA on the side of “heartless farmers” and the ANC as the “champion of exploited workers”.

    Unsurprisingly, this narrative was parroted by many observers, reinforcing stereotypes and creating conditions conducive to disinvestment and job losses in a sector that is the backbone of the Western Cape’s economy.

    Except that the truth was the exact opposite.

    I have rarely come across a case study that so graphically illustrates the disjuncture between perception and reality.

    Some of the key facts (that explode this narrative) are as follows:

    The workers’ protests started on a farm called Keurboschkloof, previously a model farm in the Western Cape where workers were paid far above the minimum wage. When the farmer, Pierre Smit, died, his farm was taken over by a Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) consortium that immediately CUT WORKERS’ WAGES from an average of R14.51 to R10.60 per hour.
    This, understandably, elicited protests by workers, further aggravated by the fact that a former ANC Councillor, who is also a labour broker, tried to bring in “scab labour” at the behest of this BEE consortium to replace the protesting workers.
    Braam Hanekom (nephew of an ANC Cabinet member) and his organisation “Passop” sought to unionise the workers for the COSATU affiliate, the Food and Allied Workers Union (FAWU).
    He was challenged by Nosey Pieterse, a rival unionist, who claimed sole right to organise workers in the area.
    When the protests spread to the Royal Mushroom Farm and Normandy Farm in mid-October, I was tipped off about an ANC strategy to “bring Marikana to the farms of the Western Cape” – a phrase used repeatedly by the ANC, and particularly Tony Ehrenreich, who combines a role as COSATU provincial general secretary and the ANC caucus leader in the City of Cape Town.
    And as the protests spread, ANC Western Cape Leader Marius Fransman made his presence felt, announcing “die Boere gaan k.k”, while the Minister of Agriculture, Tina Joemat-Petterrson also visited the area and used inflammatory language.
    But the one Minister actually responsible for labour matters, Mildred Oliphant, remained abroad for weeks, and did not bother to cut her trip short despite the protest against the minimum wage SHE HAD SET. All the while, the ANC sought to blame the farmers.

    So the truth is exactly the opposite of the prevailing narrative.

    In fact, the best option available for unskilled, seasonal farm workers in South Africa is to secure a job with a farmer like Pierre Smit, who is not a rare exception in the Western Cape. In fact, research by Ben Stanwix of UCT’s Development Policy Unit shows that on average farmers pay significantly higher wages in the Western Cape than other provinces.

    This is one of the reasons why tens of thousands of desperately poor people leave their homes in far more fertile regions across Southern Africa to seek work on the rocky mountain slopes of De Doorns and other farms in the Western Cape.

    The truth also reveals a number of profound ironies.

    Irony number one: while the ANC was slamming “heartless white farmers”, many of them were actually paying their workers more than the minimum wage that had been set by the ANC Minister of Labour, Mildred Oliphant, in consultation with COSATU.

    Irony number two: When the workers went on strike in protest, and the ANC was slamming labour brokers for playing a role in the exploitation of workers, a former ANC councillor, Nelie Barends, who is also a labour broker, tried to provide the BEE farming consortium that took over Keurboschkloof farm with scab labour. In fact, throughout the period that the ANC was slamming labour brokers’ in the Hex River Valley, their own members (including ANC councillor Pat Marran and his wife) were playing a key role as brokers supplying seasonal labour to farms.

    Irony number three: as the ANC, Passop, FAWU and Nosey Pieterse claimed to be representing the interest of the workers they were actually at war with each other, a conflict which seriously jeopardised worker interests, causing serious divisions and infighting between different groups of workers, usually divided on an ethnic basis. But they all shared one common goal: to convince workers that their “war” was actually with the farmers. All the while, ANC politicians sought to spread the unrest across the province for their political advantage.

    Irony number four: While the ANC accused farmers of fanning xenophobia, it has actually been driven by labour brokers representing differing groups of workers, and exploiting the fault lines caused by ANC policy. While Zimbabweans were legalised through a special amnesty of the Department of Home Affairs (with the support of the farmers), workers from Lesotho were excluded from the amnesty and their employment was deemed illegal and penalised through heavy fines. This meant that thousands of Basotho who had been previously employed, were now unemployed due to ANC policies, while the ANC sought to fan and exploit their anger to spread the unrest.

    Irony number five: While the ANC claims to be against labour brokers, it was the farmers, together with the Zimbabwean workers who really fought to get rid of these broker intermediaries. The Zimbabweans, in particular, resisted a consortium or labour brokers (including those with ANC links) who sought to extract from farmers R10 per day for every worker the brokers placed in a job. Zimbabweans wanted to contract directly with farmers, without an intermediary role of labour brokers. This was vehemently opposed by the labour brokers, dominated by ANC public representatives, who were determined to defend the “super profits” they earned from placing workers.

    Irony number six: The ANC and its various allied organisations, were happy to drive the conflict between the Basotho, Zimbabweans, and local labour to extend the unrest throughout rural areas, in their attempts to present the Western Cape as being exploitative, racist, and ungovernable.

    Why should anyone believe me? Go and read the primary academic research such as Ben Stanwix’s article “Minimum wages and compliance in South African agriculture” as well as a discussion document by Jan Theron (co-ordinator of the Labour and Enterprise Policy Research Group at UCT) titled “Changing employment trends on farms in the Hex and Breede River valleys” and the research paper “Violence, Labour and the Displacement of Zimbabweans in De Doorns, Western Cape” written by Jean Pierre Misago of the University of the Witwatersrand’s Forced Migration Studies Programme that contain some in-depth interviews on this matter (over and above my direct discussions with farm workers and farmers).

    There is much priceless information out there if one is prepared to join the dots.

    The best of all of these is an article titled “Oogsten in Afrika” published in the magazine Quote in October 2012, which quotes Anton de Vries, the Dutch co-founder of the BEE consortium that took over Keurboschkloof farm (that cut worker wages as soon as they took over) saying he had set up a venture to “profit” from land reform. He boasted that it was an official partner of the ANC national government and has contacts in the highest levels, which is its greatest asset.

    It is time we woke up and saw what is really happening in our platteland, instead of continuing to bow before the ANC’s warped and deliberately distorted version of events.

    The reality is that while most farmers pay significantly higher than the minimum wage they are struggling to make ends meet because of the low return on their product. For example, a “Capturing Gains” research project revealed that when it comes to the final retail price for table grapes from Hex River Valley imported to the United Kingdom, 42% goes to supermarkets, 32% to distributors, while only 18% is retained by the farmers, who must cover all their costs from this return.

    Instead, of falling prey to the ANC’s ‘divide-and-rule’ tactics, farmers, farm workers, civil society and government need to work together to address this highly distorted value chain and increase profitability on farms so that the individuals putting in the hard work start reaping the benefits.

  • Colin

    Brett, mabru, if you know what I know about the DA, you wouldn’t coin the phrase “this woman is so far ahead of anything you have to offer….”. The old adage – ‘never judge a book by its cover’ comes to mind………….

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  • Martin 13110668

    I agree, the way our SAP are operating is futile and completely out of control. The south African police are suppose to embrace the law and prevent violence and criminal behaviour , not be part of it . The
    present police believe themselves above the law and think any action they take can be approved by the fact that they think they are the law.

    As stated by the minister that police should kill the criminal if they threaten a person or community, in this case the taxi driver
    showed no threat and was brutally assaulted .the police have no right to go above the law . We all believe that criminals should pay for their crimes and there should be justice but we have to remember a criminal, even how bad the crime, is stil a person and there for have rights. If threatened by all means take any necessary action to put the criminal to justice and prevent further damage but if not why use so violence, in a case of civil matter ?

    We live in a society where our police are corrupt , embrace
    violence and most of the time part of the crime that has been committed against the community .There for police can be seen as criminals and no one feels safe with “criminals” dressed in police uniforms. No one feels safe to call the cops in a case of emergency.

    So I ask this simple question and people may differ with me ,but if our own SAP are corrupted and involved with crime ,who do we as citizens turn to ?If we see our own police as criminals of the law ,what can be said of the ministers statement about ask no question
    ,shoot to kill ;our own police cause a threat to society so what’s to prevent people to take action towards the police by following the ministers words? Our police are seen as criminals so do the rule of shoot to kill apply towards them? The minister actually gave corrupted and ready to kill police the green flag in
    shooting chaos.

    The way how our police acts with violence towards a person posing
    no threat is un lawful, that person has rights and by violating that persons rights for no good reason is a crime .Then the police are just as guilty as the criminal themselves and can be justified by the same actions they implement on others.