Quote of the week

The judgments are replete with the findings of dishonesty and mala fides against Major General Ntlemeza. These were judicial pronouncements. They therefore constitute direct evidence that Major General Ntlemeza lacks the requisite honesty, integrity and conscientiousness to occupy the position of any public office, not to mention an office as more important as that of the National Head of the DPCI, where independence, honesty and integrity are paramount to qualities. Currently no appeal lies against the findings of dishonesty and impropriety made by the Court in the judgments. Accordingly, such serious findings of fact in relation to Major General Ntlemeza, which go directly to Major General Ntlemeza’s trustworthiness, his honesty and integrity, are definitive. Until such findings are appealed against successfully they shall remain as a lapidary against Lieutenant General Ntlemeza.

Mabuse J
Helen Suzman Foundation and Another v Minister of Police and Others
28 March 2007

Zimbabwe: an explanation…

The reliable news sources report that the Zimbabwean police have entered the main opposition party headquarters and arrested its leader Morgan Tsvangirai. Of course His Masters Voice report that there are conflicting reports on this arrest as they give credence to denials of the arrest issued by that bastion of truth and honesty, the Zimbabwean police.

The question on all our lips is, of course, why South Africa has consistently underplayed the problems in Zimbabwe and at times seems to be rather reluctant to criticise the camp old tyrant north of the border? (By the way, am I the only one harbouring suspicions that Robert Mugabe might be a closet homosexual in the tradition of J Edgar Hoover?)

My theory is that South Africa’s position regarding Zimbabwe has much to do with President Thabo Mbeki’s African ambitions. He wants to be the most important and influential statesman in Africa (and then use this influence for the better of the Continent), but he is the leader of a country that is viewed suspiciously in many other parts of Africa. We are relatively wealthy and our Constitution contains rights that are shockingly “Western”. We also think of ourselves as “special” and sometimes have the cheek to talk of “Africa” as if we are not part of it.

If we criticised Mugabe in the same tones used by that unspeakably obnoxious old codger, John Howard, Mbeki’s enemies on the continent would have some ammunition to claim that he was merely an agent of Blair and Bush. Given the colonial history of Africa, most of the elites in Africa are extremely sensitive about interference from the West. So, although Mugabe is not popular amongst his fellow leaders, his stance against the West provides him with cover. He can dare Mbeki to have a go at him, knowing it will hurt Mbeki more on the Continent than it does him.

As soon as Mbeki would have a go at him, Mugabe would throw a hissy-fit (doing his “Springtime for Hitler” routine) and insecure but ambitious Mbeki would be caught in the middle. So, better keep quiet and try to work the matter behind the scenes. Who said foreign policy had anything to do with principles?

SHARE:     
BACK TO TOP
2015 Constitutionally Speaking | website created by Idea in a Forest