Quote of the week

A few months ago, author William Gumede described Zuma as someone with a narcissistic personality disorder — a set of traits defined by Austrian psychoanalyst Heinz Kohut as “including an exaggerated sense of superiority, a lack of self-awareness about the impact of their behaviour and having a disdain for others, who they devalue to validate their own grandiosity”. These people lack empathy, have a distorted sense of reality and are incapable of seeing anything from anyone else’s perspective. Narcissists like Zuma, Gumede argues, can’t accept responsibility and don’t care if they take down entire countries with them. The events at Nkandla, sadly for Zuma, only reinforced that perspective.

Rob Rose
Financial Mail
3 January 2011

In the course of his gluttonous plundering, “the movement” and/or individuals in “the movement” gained from these sordid dealings. Through all this, he was protected, like many other businessmen of his bent. The shadowy Majali was representative of a network of proxy businessmen and entities that serve ruling-party heavyweights in various sectors of the economy. Be they Chancellor House, Imvume or a host of smaller, but well-connected businesses at provincial and local levels, these proxies give the lie to the ruling party’s pronouncements on a tough anti-corruption stance. Unscrupulous businessmen and their political sponsors have been able to use the name of the party to strong-arm parastatals and government departments into giving them tenders. This network lies at the heart of the institutionalisation of corruption in our country. Sandi Majali has taken many dark secrets to the grave with him. What he did leave behind was a legacy of crookedness that goes deep into the heart of the ruling party, the state and the society. – Mondli Makhanya on Sandi Majali

SHARE:     
BACK TO TOP
2015 Constitutionally Speaking | website created by Idea in a Forest