Quote of the week

My colleagues and I often care for patients suffering from hallucinations, prophesying, and claiming to speak with God, among other symptoms—in mental health care, it’s sometimes very difficult to tell apart religious belief from mental illness…. Our conclusions frequently stem from the behaviors we see before us. Take an example of a man who walks into an emergency department, mumbling incoherently. He says he’s hearing voices in his head, but insists there’s nothing wrong with him. He hasn’t used any drugs or alcohol. If he were to be evaluated by mental health professionals, there’s a good chance he might be diagnosed with a psychotic disorder like schizophrenia. But what if that same man were deeply religious? What if his incomprehensible language was speaking in tongues?

Nathaniel P.Morris
Scientific American
14 February 2011

The problem with cronies is that they always have to eat first. Again, ask Hosni Mubarak. No matter how straight your face is when you approve your five-year plans and your growth paths and your job-creation schemes, there’s always another priority. The cronies. They’re the ones who need Transnet to build track to their mines today . They’re the ones who want this person appointed to that position. A quick special meeting before the main meeting. They’re the reason you can never truly throw yourself at any problem, just in case you get in their way. The cronies are a direct tax on the poor. Zuma can’t see it because his only direct experience of money is getting it and not making it. It’s almost not his fault, but I won’t patronise him. He is responsible for his actions and he makes his own choices. – Peter Bruce, in Business Day

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