Quote of the week

A few months ago, author William Gumede described Zuma as someone with a narcissistic personality disorder — a set of traits defined by Austrian psychoanalyst Heinz Kohut as “including an exaggerated sense of superiority, a lack of self-awareness about the impact of their behaviour and having a disdain for others, who they devalue to validate their own grandiosity”. These people lack empathy, have a distorted sense of reality and are incapable of seeing anything from anyone else’s perspective. Narcissists like Zuma, Gumede argues, can’t accept responsibility and don’t care if they take down entire countries with them. The events at Nkandla, sadly for Zuma, only reinforced that perspective.

Rob Rose
Financial Mail
16 September 2011

The Commissions Act provides that once a commission has been appointed, the President may confer upon that commission the power to summon and examine witnesses, to administer oaths and affirmations and to call for the production of books, documents and objects.Failure to comply with a subpoena issued by a commission is a punishable offence. If these powers are not conferred, the commission will have no powers beyond those enjoyed by any individual or state agency conducting an investigation. The Commissions Act may only be made applicable to a commission of inquiry if it is investigating a matter of public concern…. Making the Commissions Act applicable to a commission of inquiry therefore ensures that a commission can call witnesses and obtain the production of documents and objects on pain of punishment. Nevertheless, a commission remains an investigative body whose primary responsibility is to report to the President upon its findings. A commission is generally not entitled or empowered to take any action as a result of its findings. – The Constitutional Court in the judgment of President of the Republic of South Africa v SARFU

SHARE:     
BACK TO TOP
2015 Constitutionally Speaking | website created by Idea in a Forest