Quote of the week

An ‘important purpose of section 34 [of the Constitution] is to guarantee the protection of the judicial process to persons who have disputes that can be resolved by law’ and that the right of access to court is ‘foundational to the stability of an orderly society. It ensures the peaceful, regulated and institutionalised mechanisms to resolve disputes, without resorting to self-help. The right of access to court is a bulwark against vigilantism, and the chaos and anarchy which it causes. Construed in this context of the rule of law and the principle against self-help in particular, access to court is indeed of cardinal importance’.The right guaranteed s34 would be rendered meaningless if court orders could be ignored with impunity:the underlying purposes of the right — and particularly that of avoidance of self-help — would be undermined if litigants could decide which orders they wished to obey and which they wished to ignore.

Plasket AJ
Victoria Park Ratepayers' Association v Greyvenouw CC and others (511/03) [2003] ZAECHC 19 (11 April 2003)
4 February 2007

Arms deal: now Chippie Shaik implicated

Chippy Shaik, former head of government acquisition in the arms deal and brother of convicted fraudster, Schabir Shaik, was paid a $3m (about R21 million) bribe by one of the arms deal bidding companies, Germany’s on-line newspaper Spiegel reported on Sunday.

According to the newspaper internal documents of Thyssen Krupp – a German company that supplied South Africa with war corvette ships – has revealed that Shaik had requested the bribe in 1998.

Questions about the arms deal just does not seem to want to go away. When the history of the rise and fall of the ANC is written, the arms deal will warrant more than a footnote….

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