Quote of the week

An ‘important purpose of section 34 [of the Constitution] is to guarantee the protection of the judicial process to persons who have disputes that can be resolved by law’ and that the right of access to court is ‘foundational to the stability of an orderly society. It ensures the peaceful, regulated and institutionalised mechanisms to resolve disputes, without resorting to self-help. The right of access to court is a bulwark against vigilantism, and the chaos and anarchy which it causes. Construed in this context of the rule of law and the principle against self-help in particular, access to court is indeed of cardinal importance’.The right guaranteed s34 would be rendered meaningless if court orders could be ignored with impunity:the underlying purposes of the right — and particularly that of avoidance of self-help — would be undermined if litigants could decide which orders they wished to obey and which they wished to ignore.

Plasket AJ
Victoria Park Ratepayers' Association v Greyvenouw CC and others (511/03) [2003] ZAECHC 19 (11 April 2003)
20 October 2009

Call for Papers or Participation – Legal Challenges to Regional Co-operation: The African and European Perspectives

Call For Papers or Participation

We are pleased to announce that the Faculties of Law of the University of Tilburg, Netherlands, and North West University, South Africa, are presenting a one day seminar on Legal Challenges to Regional Co-operation: The African and European Perspectives from 8:30 – 16:00 on Friday 15 January 2010 in the Council Chambers, Institutional Office, North West University, Hoffman Street, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

The purpose of the seminar is to compare experiences in the African Union and European Union and identify legal challenges facing each of these institutions. Possible sub-themes are: Institutional structures Regional local government co-operation Human Rights protection Co-operation in law enforcement and criminal justice systems Regional environmental co-operation.

Academics and practitioners are invited to attend and participate. There will be no registration fee. Tea, coffee and lunch will be provided. Participants are responsible for their own travel and accommodation arrangements. There will be three or four panels and three papers per panel to give presenters and discussants adequate time for constructive engagement. Participants are requested to focus their papers and address the seminar theme. In addition to the general call for individual papers, proposals for panels will also be welcomed. The sub-themes are merely suggestions and all proposals on the main theme will be considered.

Abstracts for papers should please be sent to Professor Stephen de la Harpe (stephen.delaharpe@nwu.ac.za) by Friday, 27 November 2009.

Each presenter will be granted a maximum of twenty minutes for their presentation. A computer and LCD projector are available and presenters who wish to use Microsoft Powerpoint slides to present their papers should save their slides onto a USB drive for this purpose.

Participants are requested to complete the registration form on the next page. Please e-mail this form to stephanie.kotze@nwu.ac.za or fax it to +27 (0)18 299 1923 (for attention: Mrs. S Kotze) by 15 December 2009.

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