Quote of the week

Although judicial proceedings will generally be bound by the requirements of natural justice to a greater degree than will hearings before administrative tribunals, judicial decision-makers, by virtue of their positions, have nonetheless been granted considerable deference by appellate courts inquiring into the apprehension of bias. This is because judges ‘are assumed to be [people] of conscience and intellectual discipline, capable of judging a particular controversy fairly on the basis of its own circumstances’: The presumption of impartiality carries considerable weight, for as Blackstone opined at p. 361 in Commentaries on the Laws of England III . . . ‘[t]he law will not suppose possibility of bias in a judge, who is already sworn to administer impartial justice, and whose authority greatly depends upon that presumption and idea’. Thus, reviewing courts have been hesitant to make a finding of bias or to perceive a reasonable apprehension of bias on the part of a judge, in the absence of convincing evidence to that effect.

L'Heureux-Dube and McLachlin JJ
Livesey v The New South Wales Bar Association [1983] HCA 17; (1983) 151 CLR 288
7 June 2012

Calling talented prospective black law students

UCT LAW FACULTY

Calling prospective black LLB students wishing to study at UCT Law Faculty 

To mark 150 years of the teaching of law in South Africa, the Faculty of Law launched a fund raising campaign in 2008 under the umbrella ‘Towards Sustainable Justice.’ Some of the funds raised are being used to attract talented black South Africans learners to study law. There are several scholarships of R40 000 p.a. on offer.

NB: Please attach mid year results and a one-page commendation from a teacher/community leader

 

Personal details

 

Surname :  ………………………………………………………………………….

 

Full names :  …………………………………………………………………….

 

Residential home address : ……………………………………………………..

 

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S A Identity no:    …………………….… Mobile/tel. …………………………….

 

 

 

Academic, sporting and cultural achievements

 

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Why do you want to study Law? (min.100 words, max.  250 words)

 

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Signature:                                                                        Date:

 

 

 

Please return form (+ school results & letter of commendation) before 31 August

By mail:The Dean, Faculty of Law, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701.

By fax: to 021 650 5662 or hand deliver to: Rm 4.09, Kramer Building, Middle Campus, UCT

You can also scan and email to: Pauline.Alexander@uct.ac.za

Remember, this is an application for the scholarship only. You must also apply to the University of Cape Town; Online applications, www.uct.ac.za  Tel 021 650 2128

Fax 021 650 5189 or e mail admissions@uct.ac.

CLOSING DATE 31 AUGUST

 

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