Quote of the week

As seductive as certain perspectives of international law may appear to those who disagree with the outcome of the interpretative exercise conducted by this Court in the contempt judgment, sight must not be lost of the proper place of international law, especially in respect of an application for rescission. The approach that my Brother adopts may be apposite in the context of an appeal, where a court is enjoined to consider whether the court a quo erred in its interpretation of the law. Although it should be clear by now, I shall repeat it once more: this is not an appeal, for this Court’s orders are not appealable. I am deeply concerned that seeking to rely on articles of the ICCPR as a basis for rescission constitutes nothing more than sophistry.

Khampepe J
Zuma v Secretary of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector Including Organs of State and Others (CCT 52/21) [2021] ZACC 28 (17 September 2021)
27 April 2007

Curiouser and curiouser

The story of the ANC and the hoax emails just get curiouser and curiouser. According to the Mail & Guardian the ANC task team asked to investigate the matter, found that the emails were genuine in the sense that they “existed in cyberspace” – they were written and sent by individuals – and were not fabricated by NIA officials.

Now former National Intelligence Agency boss Billy Masetlha has subpoenaed ANC secretary general Kgalema Motlanthe to hand over the ruling party’s “hoax” email report.

Masetlha’s motive in summonsing Motlanthe is straightforward: he is accused of being central to the fabrication of the emails, while the report finds that other, as yet unnamed, actors are responsible. If the document goes public, the authenticity of the messages would have to be further investigated.

What I do not understand is how anyone in his or her right mind could ever have thought that the content of the emails were genuine. When the Mail & Guardian published extracts from the emails, it became clear that they were obviously false. Yet people like Kgalema Motlanthe actually seem to have believed in their authenticity.

It seems to suggest that the ANC is so riddled with infighting and some of its leaders so paranoid that they would believe in the authenticity of such crude fabrications. It is embarrassing that Motlanthe, whose name is mentioned as a compromise candidate for the ANC Presidency, could have fallen for them.

Or was he set up by pro-Mbeki people to discredit him and eliminate him from the racefor the President of the ANC? Maybe he was handed the emails and someone very influential and important whispered in his ear that the emails were genuine exactly to set him up. But even if that is the case, the fact that he could have beleived in the authenticity of the emails probably makes him too paranoid and/or stupid to become President of South Africa.

SHARE:     
BACK TO TOP
2015 Constitutionally Speaking | website created by Idea in a Forest