Quote of the week

The problem with this perspective is cancel culture isn’t real, at least not in the way people believe it is. Instead, it’s turned into a catch-all for when people in power face consequences for their actions or receive any type of criticism, something that they’re not used to. I’m a black, Muslim woman, and because of social media, marginalized people like myself can express ourselves in a way that was not possible before. That means racist, sexist, and bigoted behavior or remarks don’t fly like they used to. This applies to not only wealthy people or industry leaders but anyone whose privilege has historically shielded them from public scrutiny. Because they can’t handle this cultural shift, they rely on phrases like “cancel culture” to delegitimize the criticism.

Sarah Hagi
Time
25 April 2013

Eastern Cape rural schools visit

I am in Mthatha with a delegation led by Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, visiting various rural schools to draw attention to the inequalities in our education system and highlight the need for the formulation of detailed and precise norms and standards setting out, at the very least, the minimum conditions in which children will be able to learn with dignity.

I will write a more reflective piece when I get time. Meanwhile I post a few pictures taken yesterday.

At Putuma Junior Secondary School more than hundred children cram into one classroom. The school is known for its choir which won the national championship last year. This is a picture of one children in grade 9.

At Sea View Secondary School only 13% of matrics passed last year. These unfinished classrooms are being built by the community. Students waiting for fellow class mates to complete their lesson in the classroom they share, hang out in these unfinished classrooms.

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