Quote of the week

Although judicial proceedings will generally be bound by the requirements of natural justice to a greater degree than will hearings before administrative tribunals, judicial decision-makers, by virtue of their positions, have nonetheless been granted considerable deference by appellate courts inquiring into the apprehension of bias. This is because judges ‘are assumed to be [people] of conscience and intellectual discipline, capable of judging a particular controversy fairly on the basis of its own circumstances’: The presumption of impartiality carries considerable weight, for as Blackstone opined at p. 361 in Commentaries on the Laws of England III . . . ‘[t]he law will not suppose possibility of bias in a judge, who is already sworn to administer impartial justice, and whose authority greatly depends upon that presumption and idea’. Thus, reviewing courts have been hesitant to make a finding of bias or to perceive a reasonable apprehension of bias on the part of a judge, in the absence of convincing evidence to that effect.

L'Heureux-Dube and McLachlin JJ
Livesey v The New South Wales Bar Association [1983] HCA 17; (1983) 151 CLR 288
23 June 2010

MSF Soccer game for HIV awareness

9 days left!

HALFTIME – A SOCCER MATCH WITH A GOAL

Dear Friend,

The eyes of the world are fixed on South Africa and we are sure you have felt the anticipation and excitement of the 2010 FIFA World Cup since the kick-off last week. Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has decided to take this opportunity to draw attention to the HIV/AIDS crisis facing over 22 million people in sub-Saharan Africa.

MSF South Africa invites you to join us in HalfTime, a soccer match with a goal!

On 2 July 2010, in Johannesburg people living with HIV and MSF staff from several countries in Southern Africa are coming together to play a special soccer match against HIV/AIDS. This will take the form of a one day 5-a-side tournament that seeks to show that Halftime is no time to quit funding for anti-retroviral drugs.

Why HalfTime?

Think of the battle against HIV/AIDS as a deciding football match played between people living with HIV and the HIV virus itself…

The scores are tied in a draw at 1 all. HIV can still win the match if the funding for life saving ARV’s, which will help people to stay well enough to play the second half of the game of life, is stopped.

MSF provides antiretroviral treatment to over 140,000 people in 30 countries around the world and in the last 18 months we have observed international donors after years of commitment now capping, reducing or withdrawing their funding for antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). Our programmes are having to cut back on the number of people they put on ARV’s . This may mean that millions of people are at risk of dying unnecessarily.

Visit our new blog Extra-Time which presents an alternative view on World Cup from the perspective of HIV/Aids people and MSF field workers.

The MSF coach is working on the match tactics, so remember to keep an eye out for the next email on 29 June which will reveal the strategy for this deciding game!

Best regards,

Liz Thompson
General Director
MSF South Africa
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