Quote of the week

The law, like the suburban American house, is designed to order a particular pattern of relationships, many of them oriented around the heterosexual nuclear family. For real people in contemporary circumstances to inhabit the house the law built, one has to find side doors and discreet corners, while the dominant space changes little and the façade remains unaltered. The two big L.G.B.T.-rights Supreme Court victories that came before Bostock—Windsor and Obergefell—did exactly that: they carved out a place for monogamous same-sex couples who want to marry (statistically, these are more apt to be white middle-class people like the plaintiffs) in the house of the American nuclear family.

Martha Gessen
The New Yorker
11 December 2015

Munusamy on swearing in of new Finance Minister

Zuma could not be bothered to do so. His tone was flat as he announced the appointment and handed over Constitutional Court Judge Sisi Khampepe to administer the oath. When Zuma and Van Rooyen shook hands, there was little rapport between the two. Van Rooyen looked nervous and uncertain, only smiling briefly at Zuma. What is clear is that Van Rooyen has no personal connection to the president; he came on recommendation from those close to Zuma. From an interview North West Premier Supra Mahumapelo did with ANN7 television, it appears Van Rooyen is favoured by the “premier league” lobby in the ANC.

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