Quote of the week

Once the powers and functions have been assigned, the Deputy President and Ministers are responsible for the executive powers and functions assigned to them. These provisions make plain that members of the Cabinet are accountable independently and collectively to Parliament for the exercise of their powers and performance of their functions. For good measure, section 92(3) of the Constitution restates the obvious which is that, when they exercise the powers assigned to them, members of the Cabinet must act in accordance with the Constitution. This is significant because once Cabinet ministers are assigned powers and functions by the President they are not mere vassals of the President. They bear the duty and the responsibility to fulfil the duties and functions so assigned which in practice take the form of political and executive leadership of specified state departments. The Constitution makes the point that besides the duty to account to the head of the national executive, cabinet ministers bear the responsibility to report and account to Parliament on how they execute their executive duties.

Moseneke DCJ
Von Abo v President of the Republic of South Africa (CCT 67/08) [2009] ZACC 15; 2009 (10) BCLR 1052 (CC) ; 2009 (5) SA 345 (CC) (5 June 2009)
17 December 2015

UCT Law Invitation, 23 January 2016: Race, Law and Transformation

Issues of race and transformation of legal education is the focus of a programme to be hosted at the University of Cape Town on Saturday January 23rd, 2016.   This event is free and open to the public.  Space is limited and an RSVP is recommended.

The first panel, entitled Race, Law and Transformation, will examine the issues of race and the unfinished business of transformation as articulated in the South African constitution.   The panelists will address these issues against the backdrop of widespread protests in South Africa in the past few years linked to service delivery and other issues, as well as the widespread student protests at the University of Cape Town and elsewhere.   Panelists include University of Cape Town Professors Waheeda Amien and Pierre de Vos, University of the Witwatersrand Professors Achille Mbembe and Ntombizozuko Dyani-Mhango, and Professor Kendall Thomas of Columbia Law School.   The panel will be moderated by Judge Shehnaz Meer, Acting Judge President of the Land Claims Court.

The second panel, entitled Transformation of Legal Education will address the possibilities and limitations of the law school curriculum and law school pedagogy.   It will seek to challenge historical and contemporary approaches to the training of legal professionals, to address the question whether law schools are in fact giving voice to the transformative potential of the constitution.   Panelists include Professor Managay Reddi, Dean of the Faculty of Law, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Judge Dennis Davis, Cape High Court, Professor Lesley Greenbaum, University of Cape Town Faculty of Law, Professor Geo Quinot, University of Stellenbosch Faculty of Law, and Mr. Joel Modiri, University of Pretoria Faculty of Law.   The panel will be moderated by Professor Bernard Martin, Dean of the Faculty of Law, University of the Western Cape.

The event is the initiative of the incoming Dean of the Faculty of Law, Professor Penelope Andrews, and will take place at the Kramer School of Law, Middle Campus, University of Cape Town, from 9.00 a.m. to 1.15 p.m. with a refreshment break at 11.00 a.m.   Please RSVP toPauline.Alexander@uct.ac.za

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