Quote of the week

As seductive as certain perspectives of international law may appear to those who disagree with the outcome of the interpretative exercise conducted by this Court in the contempt judgment, sight must not be lost of the proper place of international law, especially in respect of an application for rescission. The approach that my Brother adopts may be apposite in the context of an appeal, where a court is enjoined to consider whether the court a quo erred in its interpretation of the law. Although it should be clear by now, I shall repeat it once more: this is not an appeal, for this Court’s orders are not appealable. I am deeply concerned that seeking to rely on articles of the ICCPR as a basis for rescission constitutes nothing more than sophistry.

Khampepe J
Zuma v Secretary of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector Including Organs of State and Others (CCT 52/21) [2021] ZACC 28 (17 September 2021)
18 April 2007

Snuki Zikalala (Phd Bulgaria) on Zimbabwe

Journalist and comedian, Marian Thamm, has written a bitingly funny column for News24 on the musings of Snuki Zikalala, SABC Managing Director of News and Current Affairs about Zimbabwe. Apparently Zikalala announced on the radio on Sunday that the SABC was planning to open a bureau in Zimbabwe in a few months’ time to tell the “real” story of Zimbabwe.

Thamm takes up the story:

At one point Herr Doktor Zikalala told Maggs; “For instance people say there is no food in Zimbabwe but this is nonsense. There is food, it’s just very expensive.”

I waited for Maggs to burst out laughing, as I was about to do. And then my stomach turned as I realised Zikalala was serious, dead serious.

As serious as he was in 2005 after the Zimbabwean parliamentary elections when he told members of his SABC editorial staff that it was a lie that there was no food in Zimbabwe and that people were starving.

Back then he had told a group of journalists (and others) that during his stay in the Sheraton in Harare he had in fact enjoyed freshly baked bread rolls daily. He added that he had also had no trouble ordering Johnny Walker Black and even mineral water. And what’s more, he insisted triumphantly, he had even got room service to bring it to him so what the hell was everyone on about?


Of course, that’s the answer, why didn’t we think of it! Zimbabweans just need to ring the Sheraton’s room service to solve their food problems!

This in the same week that the Star kicked off a series by journalist Fiona Farr, who snuck into Zim as an Irish tourist over the Easter holidays. Talking to ordinary Zimbabweans Farr found deprivation, fear and a deep terror of speaking out against ZANU-PF or Mugabe. “It’s on the brink of becoming a second Ethiopia,” she told Gwala with regard levels of starvation, particularly in rural areas.

I wonder what Zikalala thinks is the “real” story about South Africa and to what extent he thinks the mainstream media gets it wrong?
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