Quote of the week

The problem with this perspective is cancel culture isn’t real, at least not in the way people believe it is. Instead, it’s turned into a catch-all for when people in power face consequences for their actions or receive any type of criticism, something that they’re not used to. I’m a black, Muslim woman, and because of social media, marginalized people like myself can express ourselves in a way that was not possible before. That means racist, sexist, and bigoted behavior or remarks don’t fly like they used to. This applies to not only wealthy people or industry leaders but anyone whose privilege has historically shielded them from public scrutiny. Because they can’t handle this cultural shift, they rely on phrases like “cancel culture” to delegitimize the criticism.

Sarah Hagi
Time
6 March 2007

Viva Ghana!

Thousands of cheering Ghanaians waving the red, yellow and green national flag packed a central square in the capital on Tuesday to celebrate the 50th birthday of the first nation in sub-Saharan Africa to win independence. According to the Mail & Guardian, Accra’s Independence Square was transformed into a sea of fluttering flags as excited crowds of citizens joined invited dignitaries to celebrate the March 6 1957 anniversary of the end of British colonial rule over Ghana.

This is a deeply symbolic event for all Africans. The day a party like the DA fully grasps the momentous nature of these celebrations of Africa’s first independent state and acts accordingly, will be the day when black people will consider voting for them.

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